Undergraduate

  • ECE-101 Digital Electronics

    Prerequisites:

    ECE L101 MUST BE TAKEN CONCURRENTLY

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course introduces the elements and tools of digital design. The course covers Boolean algebra, Karnaugh maps, Logic gates and digital circuits, analysis and design of combinational and sequential circuits, and timing issues. Adders, decoders, multiplexers, flip-flops, counters, and registers are implemented using TTL or CMOS ICs as well as VHDL-programmed FPGAs. Formerly ECE 203

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ECE-L101 Digital Electronics-Lab

    Prerequisites:

    ECE 101 MUST BE TAKEN CONCURRENTLY.

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Illustrates the concepts of ECE-101. Exercises in various forms of Combinational and Sequential Logic design. Use of test equipment. Design projects will include a digital security system, use of PSPICE to verify feasibility of some designs. FPGA board citing Xilinx, software development tools from Xilinx and other third parties are introduced. Offered yearly. Formerly ECE L203

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ECE-105 Circuit Theory I

    Prerequisites:

    ECE L105 must be taken concurrently; MATH 165 or MATH-164

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Basic elements and analysis techniques of DC circuits. Coverage includes resistors, capacitors, inductors, and sensors ; independent and dependent sources. Ohm's law, power, energy, and power transfer. Kirchoff's voltage and current laws; Nodal and Loop analyses; Thevenin and Norton equivalents; step and transient responses of first-order systems; time constants. Emphasis on functional circuits. Prerequisite: Must be taken concurrently with ECE L105. Must take MATH 121(must have a minimum grade of C in preqs.) 1 term - 3 credits.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ECE-L105 Circuit Theory Lab I

    Prerequisites:

    ECE 105 must be taken concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    The Circuit Theory Lab I is designed to supplement the Circuit Theory I course.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ECE-205 Circuit Theory II

    Prerequisites:

    ECE 105 with C or better; MATH 166 & PHYS 152 concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Analysis and design of lumped networks. Resistive elements, superposition, nodal analysis, dependent sources, equivalence theorems. Energy storage in elements, dynamics of first and second order networks, transient responses, phasors, sinusoidal steady state analysis, steady state power analysis, three phase power circuits. Offered yearly.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ECE-L205 Circuit Theory II Lab

    Prerequisites:

    ECE 205 MUST BE TAKEN CONCURRENTLY

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Illustrates the concepts of ECE 205. Simulations with PSPICE, LABVIEW, NXT Robotics, INCSYS Power Simulator, Mathematica; construction and design. First order, second order transients, ideal and non-ideal transformer circuits, sinusoidal steady state circuits, power grid simulation. Offered yearly.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ECE-206 Solid State Devices and Circuits

    Prerequisites:

    ECE L206 must be taken concurrently; ECE 205(must have a minimum grade of C in preqs.)

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Review of Thevenin and Norton Equivalent circuits. Frequency Domain analysis and Bode Plots. Representation of an active device by its Gain, Input and Output Resistance. Thorough coverage of op amps - circuits, applications, and inherent limitations. Introduction to semiconductor physics and the PN junction. Diode circuits, applications, and models. Zener diodes and power supplies. Ripple estimations. The Bipolar Junction Transistor - large and small signal analyses. Active, cutoff, and saturation region characterization. Hybrid Pi and T models. Basic transistor configurations - common collector, common base, and common emitter - along with their characteristics, applications, and tradeoffs. Estimation of bandwidth using open circuit time constants. Prerequisite: ECE 205. Must have at least a C in this. Co-requisite: ECE L206

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ECE-L206 Solid State Devices & Circuits Lab

    Prerequisites:

    ECE 206 must be taken concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    The Solid State Devices & Circuits Lab is designed to supplement the Solid State Devices & Circuits course.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ECE-225 Linear Systems

    Prerequisites:

    MATH 166 and ECE 205 with a minimum grade of C; ECE L225 Concurrently.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Classification of systems, differential equations, linear algebra, discrete mathematics, derivation of the system model, state variable description, impulse response, convolution, frequency response of discrete and continuous systems. Fourier Series,Fourier transforms, Fourier methods of discrete signals, Laplace transforms, Z transform, analysis of control systems.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ECE-L225 Linear Systems Lab

    Prerequisites:

    MUST BE TAKEN CONCURRENTLY WITH ECE 225

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    The Linear Systems lab is designed to supplement the Linear Systems course. Matlab simulation of linear systems, Hardware Implementation of Analog Filters, measurement of the transfer function.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ECE-288 Measuring the World

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The world is addicted to quantifying the essence of everything, from personal IQ, to the speed of a baseball, to our healthiness, or our chances of winning the lottery. Behind most of these numeric values exists a science of measurement. Some of this is referenced to international standards, such as for length, time, weight, or temperature. Others are more arbitrary and subjective, such as ranking Olympic performance in gymnastics, beauty pageants, or popular responses as found in the game show Family Feud. A third category includes controversial areas, such as measuring whether a person is lying when interrogated, or using hype rather than reality to market products. Sometimes statistics are used to predict sports outcomes, such as in the annual March Madness NCAA basketball brackets. Finally, in a world subject to fraud and deception, it can be essential to distinguish legitimate from counterfeit items, such as in money, art, collectibles, and historical documents. Don't get hoodwinked! This course examines all of these, starting with how measurements have been made throughout history, along with a full deck of entertaining terms used during the ages. This may help you sort out your weight, whether given in pounds, kilos, or stones. Often these terms will provide insights into how people lived in different eras. We will also look at some of the technologies currently available to provide these measurements, and unravel the complexities of various sensors that are used. As we consider the meaning of accuracy we may become less naive about how much confidence to ascribe to the results given us. Hovering around all of these measurements should be the question of validity - are they meaningful, useful, or misleading? And the impact they have on society - whether they steer behavior more powerfully than one might originally suspect. Each student will also be given an opportunity to become an expert in an area of measurement of personal interest. By the end o

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • ECE-306 Solid State Devices, Power and Circuits

    Prerequisites:

    ECE-206 with a minimum grade of C. ECE L306 concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Continuation of Solid State Dev & Circuits I, with emphasis on MOSFET field effect transistors; Physical structure, I-V characteristics, modeling, use as a switch and CMOS inverter, biasing circuits, and basic amplifier configurations - common drain, common gate, and common source. Differential Amplifiers - BJT and MOSFET implementations, along with small and large signal analysis. Multistage circuits, active loads. Design of current source and current mirrors. Internal capacitance and high frequency limitations. Low midband, and high frequency analyses of transistor amplifiers. Miller effect. Open and Short Circuit Time Constants. Cascade and Cascode configurations. Frequency response of amplifiers. Significant circuit design activities. Course tightly coupled to ECE-L306.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ECE-L306 Solid State Devices, Power and Circuits Lab

    Prerequisites:

    ECE 306 must be taken concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Illustrates the concepts of ECE 306. Exercises that help meld the practical aspects with the theoretical concepts taught in ECE 306. Biasing and design of MOSFET amplifiers. Construction of differential and multistage amplifiers. Investigation of different current source implementations. Simulation of bandwidth improvement using Cascode structures. Course concludes with a multistage design challenge using MOSFETs to reach a specified gain, output impedance and bandwidth objective provided by the instructor.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ECE-307 Electric Power Systems - Analysis and Design

    Prerequisites:

    MA166; ECE 205; ECE 206 and ECE 403 helpful, but not required

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course is a first course in understanding the components that compose the high power grid. Generation of power; transmission line characteristics, load impacts. Real and reactive power along with compensation techniques. Transformers. Synchronous generators and motors. Power flow. Power quality. Transient and dynamic stability issues. Handling faults, overvoltage and surge protection. Electronic control by high power devices such as thyristors, relays, and circuit breakers. HVDC examined. Recent developments and opportunities in the Power field. A strong emphasis placed on problems solving and representative exercises.

  • ECE-308 Electric Power Systems II

    Prerequisites:

    ECE-307

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Course will further pursue issues started in ECE 307. This will include motors and generators, entire system modeling, symmetrical and non-symmetrical fault analysis and correction, design of power converter divides, and recent developments in the power industry. Simulation tools will be used to model different aspects of a complete electric power system. Essentially this course will cover the second half of the Grainger and Stevenson text introduced in ECE 307.

  • ECE-309 Labview and Electric Circuits and Machines

    Prerequisites:

    ECE-206 and ECE-L309 must be taken concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The purpose of this course is twofold: to give students facility in programming and data acquisition in Labview, and to use Labview to learn about power concepts such as three-phase, power corrections, per units, Star (Wye) and Delta connections, magnetic circuits, power electronic circuits, electric machines. Lab component reinforces concept taught in course.

  • ECE-L309 Labview and Electric Circuits and Machines Lab

    Prerequisites:

    ECE-206 and ECE-309 must be taken concurrently.

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    The purpose of this course is twofold: to give students facility in programming and data acquisition in Labview, and to use Labview to learn about power concepts such as three-phase, power connections, per units, Star (Wye) and Delta connections, magnetic circuits, power electronic circuits, electric machines. Lab component reinforces concept taught in course.

  • ECE-310 Special Topics in Engineering

    Prerequisites:

    ECE 206 and MATH 166 with a minimum grade of C

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Selected topics in Computer Engineering or Electrical Engineering. Offered to upper level students by permission of instructor. Prerequisite: ECE 206 and MATH 166, or instructors' approval. 1 term - 4 credits. Minimum grade of C in prerequisites.

  • ECE-311 Embedded Systems

    Prerequisites:

    ECE-203 and ECE-206 with a minimum grade of C and ENS-333 OR CMPSC-F131 with a minimum grade of C and ECE-L311 concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course will introduce the fundamentals of embedded micro controllers for system level applications: fundamental elements - sensors or transducers, microcontrollers, and the interfacing to external components. Procedural methods for design of the complete embedded system are developed. Programming using assembly, and C languages is utilized. Must take ECE L311 concurrently. Prerequisites: ECE 203 AND ECE 206, AND ENS-333 or CMPSC F131 (minimum grade of C in prereqs.) 1 term - 3 credits.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ECE-L311 Embedded Systems Lab

    Prerequisites:

    Must take ECE 311 concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    The Embedded Systems Lab is designed to supplement the Embedded Systems course.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ECE-325 Statistics for Engineering and Science

    Prerequisites:

    MATH 166 with a minimum grade of C; Must take ECE L325 concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Understanding the fundamentals of probability and statistics of experimental data. Measures of central tendency, variation, probability, events, Bayes Rule, discrete and continuous random variables, discrete and continuous distributions including the binomial distribution, normal distribution, chi-square distribution and student distribution, covariance, central limit theorem, hypothesis testing, linear regression, signal processing statistics (EE students), categorical data analysis (non-EE students). Use of Mathematica's statistical packages central to this course. Final project is a project with Biology measuring rat whisker resonance.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ECE-L325 Statistics for Engineering and Science Lab

    Prerequisites:

    ECE L325 MUST BE TAKEN WITH ECE 325

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    The Engineering Statistics and Probability lab is designed to supplement the Engineering Statistics and Probability course.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ECE-335 Control Systems

    Prerequisites:

    ECE 225; Min Grade of C in Prereq. ECE L335 Concurrently.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduction to feedback control systems; control system characteristics (stability, sensitivity, disturbance rejection, steady-state accuracy, transient response); stability analysis; root-locus analysis and design; frequency-response analysis and design; analysis and design of digital control systems. Normally offered bi-yearly.

  • ECE-L335 Control Systems Lab

    Prerequisites:

    ECE 335 MUST BE TAKEN CONCURRENTLY.

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    The Control Systems lab is designed to supplement the Control Systems course.

  • ECE-390 Data & Computer Communications

    Prerequisites:

    ECE 225 with a minimum grade of C;

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Basic principles and topics in data communication, local area networks, wide area networks, communication architectures and protocols. Data transmission, encoding, multiplexing, circuit switching, packet switching, frame relays, and asynchronous transfer mode are also discussed. The TCP/IP protocol suite is studied and a project involving configuring, implementing, and installing a network is carried out during the semester. Prerequisite: ECE 225 or instructor's approval. Must be taken concurrently with ECE L390.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ECE-L390 Data & Computer Communications Lab

    Prerequisites:

    Must be taken concurrently with ECE 390

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    The Data and Computer Communications lab is designed to supplement the Data and Computer Communications course.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ECE-403 Applied Electromagnetics

    Prerequisites:

    ECE 205 and MATH 265 with a minimum grade of C; ECE L403 must be taken concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Electrostatics and magnetostatics, including Coulomb's law, Gauss's law, Biot-Savart law and Ampere's law, vector operations in rectangular, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates, divergence theorem and Stokes theorem, electric fields in materials, Lorentz force, magnetic torque, Faraday's law, Maxwell's equation, wave propagation, transmission lines with Smith charts, rectangular waveguides, Hertzian dipole antenna; examples related to power when applicable.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ECE-L403 Applied Electromagnetics Lab

    Prerequisites:

    Must be taken concurrently with ECE 403

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    The Applied Electromagnetics Lab is designed to supplement the Applied Electromagnetics course.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ECE-406 Solid State Devices & Circuits III

    Prerequisites:

    ECE-205 and ECE-206 with a minimum grade of C and ECE-L406 concurrently and at least a 3.0 GPA

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is an extension of ECE 206 and ECE 306. Advantages of feedback. Reduction of four fundamental feedback configurations to simplified equivalence. Loop gain and stability issues. Gain and Phase Margins. Frequency compensating techniques. Miller effect. Class A, AB, and B amplifier output stages. Power BJT applications and thermal issues. Voltage mode op amp design - small signal gain and frequency analysis. Current mode op amp design. A/D and D/A converters. Design of Active, BiQuad and Switched Capacitor filters, and LCR resonator circuits. Oscillator design - Wien Bridge and Phase shift types, along with amplitude limiting. Multivibrators.

  • ECE-L406 Solid State Devices & Circuit III Lab

    Prerequisites:

    Must be taken concurrently with ECE-406

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Utilizes the concepts of ECE 406. Simulating Dependent sources. PSPICE confirmation of feedback circuit simplification and linearization. Output gain stages and cross-over distortion. Vbe multipliers. Oscillator design. Final project includes design, simulation, and implementation (using discrete parts) of either a voltage or current mode op amp with unity gain stability and determination of band width. Normally offered biyearly.

  • ECE-410 Communication Systems

    Prerequisites:

    ECE 206, ECE 225 and MATH 265 with a minimum grade of C; L410 concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Coverage of a variety of basic communication systems, their theory of operation, and the analysis of their performance. Review of linear systems, Fourier and Laplace Transforms, and Frequency Domain analysis as needed. Graphical convolution of analog signals. Digital Baseband modulation techniques. Receiver design with an introduction to Stochastics. Digital Bandpass modulation and demodulation techniques. Analog communication systems including AM, FM, and PM approaches. Consideration of Noise and the resultant system performance. Multiplexing and information compression. ECE 410 and ECE L410 must be taken concurrently.

  • ECE-L410 Communications Systems Lab

    Prerequisites:

    ECE 410 must be taken concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Illustrates the concepts of ECE 410. Exercises will focus both on communication system components and in the construction of a complete communication system. Introduction to FSK, DTMF, Phase lock loops, AM and FM modulation, oscillators, A/D and D/A conversion and the Nyquist rate. Wireless transmissions. Troubleshooting of non-working systems. Students have flexibility in the design and construction a full communication system which includes digitization, rearrangement in parallel and serial formats, transmission over a distance, and reconstruction back to its original analog form.

  • ECE-411 Senior Project I

    Prerequisites:

    ECE 205, ECE 306, ECE 225, MATH 265; permission of the instructor may be required.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The Senior Project provides a significant opportunity for students to direct all of their previous training and learning towards one major endeavor. It has been modified from previous years to extend over two semesters (instead of one) to facilitate a more comprehensive effort in both the planning and execution of the project. Although resources and guidance are provided for each student, this course still requires them to take full responsibility to plan their time, manage, and implement their project. In Part I the student creates their project proposal. Over a fourteen-week period the student is subjected to the practical stress of completing and delivering in professional fashion a project of their own choosing (with endorsement from an appropriate faculty advisor or industrial mentor). This period includes the following objectives: selection and careful definition of a project; a review of background information; a selection of the desired approach with justification; identification of resources needed; an outline of the project implementation timetable with desired milestones; a delineation of how the completed project performance might be evaluated. Weekly progress reports and meeting with their advisor are required. A formal proposal document is reviewed by department members (and possibly Industrial constituents) and may go through numerous iterations to be deemed 'acceptable'. Along the way informal oral presentations of both the 'general' and 'technical' aspects of their project will be presented to the rest of their peer group. A formal presentation of the project proposal is made to an audience of peers, faculty, and outside advisors. Prerequisites: ECE 205, ECE 306, ECE 225, MA265; permission of the instructor may be required. ECR

  • ECE-412 Senior Project II

    Prerequisites:

    ECE 411

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    In Part II the student implements, documents, and presents their completed project. Having defined their project, students gather the resources necessary and proceed to execute their designs. This period will include the construction, testing, troubleshooting, refinement, and evaluation of their project. A formal presentation of the project is made. A professional caliber documentation of the project is also required, and may go through numerous iterations of review. The final project report must consider most of the following: environmental impact, sustainability, manufacturability, ethics, health and safety issues, and political concerns. Time management, prioritization of process, formal communication, overcoming obstacles and meeting deadlines are monitored by the project advisor. Weekly reports and meetings are expected. The advisor also serves as a resource for the student. However, full responsibility for the success of the project rests on the student. Cross-disciplinary projects are encouraged. ECR

  • ECE-414 Senior Project Proposal

    Prerequisites:

    Take ECE-101, ECE-206. Take MATH-164 or MATH-165

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    The aim of this course is for students to generate a thoughtful and well -written senior project proposal. This course will provide guidelines and critiquing for that purpose. By the end of the course, students will have narrowly identified their project, performed a review of current available related technology, and selected the approach they will pursue. They will also establish a parts list, timetable, set of milestones, and basis or procedure for determining an answer to the question how good is it? At the end of the course they will formally present their project and write a comprehensive project proposal document. Once accepted, they are permitted to take ENS 415 Senior Project. Note that this course is focused on the process of creating a viable proposal. Enough flexibility exists that students may either implement the project they documented in this course when they take ENS 415, or may pursue an alternative project if desired. Also note that this course replaces ECE 411 for the graduating class of 2016.

  • ECE-415 Senior Project

    Prerequisites:

    Take ECE-414;

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    For the senior project the student implements, documents, and presents their completed project of the proposal generated in ENS 414. Having defined their project, students gather the resources necessary and proceed to execute their designs. This period will include the construction, testing, troubleshooting, refinement, and evaluation of their project. A formal presentation of the project is made. A professional caliber documentation of the project is also required, and may go through numerous iterations of review. The final project report must consider most of the following: environmental impact, sustainability, manufacturability, ethics, health and safety issues, and political concerns. Time management, prioritization of process, formal communication, overcoming obstacles and meeting deadlines are monitored by the project advisor. Weekly reports and meetings are expected. The advisor also serves as a resource for the student. However, full responsibility for the success of the project rests on the student. Cross-disciplinary projects are encouraged. Note: Replaces ECE 412 for the graduating class of 2016.

  • ECE-430 Digital Signal Processing

    Prerequisites:

    ECE 225, ECE 203 with minimum grade of C; ECE L430 concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Discrete signals and systems, digital simulation of analog systems, Z transforms, recursion equations, finite-order systems, Fourier transforms, line spectra and Fourier series, discrete Fourier series and Fast Fourier Transforms (FTT), sampling and interpolation, mean-square approximations, non-recursive and recursive filters, selected topics on algorithms, design and applications of digital signal processing. There will be an end-of-semester design project that will involve students' creativity, design of open ended projects, formulation of alternative solutions, detailed system description, realistic constraints (economic factors, safety, reliability, aesthetics ethics, and social impact).

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ECE-L430 Digital Signal Processing Lab

    Prerequisites:

    ECE 430 must be taken concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Illustrates the concepts of ECE 430. This laboratory course uses MATLAB, Simulink, and the Texas Instruments 6713 DPS board to design, test and implement various projects. The students will also learn how to use FPGA boards to design and implement various DSP systems. There will be a design project at the end of the course designed to synthesize what the students have learned.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ECE-510 Independent Study

    Prerequisites:

    An independent study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

    Credits:

    1.00- 6.00

    Description:

    This is an independent study in electrical and computer engineering. Topics will vary.

  • ENS-103 Introduction to Engineering

    Prerequisites:

    ENS L103 MUST BE TAKEN CONCURRENTLY.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course provides exposure to engineering practice, with particular focus on electrical engineering components such as circuit elements and systems. It seeks to go beyond the mathematics and provide an intuitive appreciation of functional devices. Examples taken from a broad swath of technological history illustrate significant crossroads, decisions, and inventiveness. Emphasis is placed on learning to think as an engineer - assessment of problems, candidate solution tradeoffs, and implementations. Frequent exercises in creative engineering design will be used. Students will be required to design several elementary devices, such as a magnet, a capacitor, a timing device, and a motor, which they will enter in a competition for overall strength, compactness, accuracy, or speed. Sometimes assignments relate to "survival on an island" concerns, such as communication or drinking water. Students also learn about reverse engineering by selecting, building, troubleshooting, and presenting an electronic kit of their choice. A term paper determining the engineering behind a topic of their choice will also be written and presented. On occasion (see ENS L103) there will be team competitions between various smaller groups in the class.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • ENS-L103 Intro to Engineering Lab

    Prerequisites:

    Must be taken Concurrently w/ ENS-103

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    The Lab is designed to provide opportunities to gain familiarity with engineering tools. Students will be introduced to parts (e.g. learn the resistor color code), test equipment (multimeters, prototyping trainers, signal generators, and oscilloscopes), and construction techniques (wiring, soldering, troubleshooting). Although it varies from year to year, Class Projects can be built during the Lab sessions. In the past these have included a 25 Watt electric generator, various door lock systems (both mechanical and electronic), and an AM transmitter and receiver (all projects made from scratch). It is likely that 2010-2011 may introduce some robotic creations for a competition. Electronic kits and motors can also be built and serviced in the Lab. There is an adjoining machine shop, which can be utilized (with supervision), for fabricating items. Individual creativity is encouraged, and informal problem solving sessions occasionally occupy lab time. However, the lab is accessible outside of the traditional scheduled time.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • ENS-201 Engineering Mechanics

    Prerequisites:

    PHYS 151

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Forces, statics, and dynamics of rigid bodies, stress and strain analysis, kinematics, computer aided analysis. Focus on professional standards in practice for design of structures.

  • ENS-L202 Technical Communication

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102, PHYS 152 AND L152;

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Emphasis on clarity, precision, accuracy, and conciseness in scientific writing. Assignments include a team-based design-contest proposal, an oral presentation on current scientific topics, a team-based design of an experiment with a write-up and an oral presentation, a paper on engineering ethics concerning the Challenger and an instruction manual. Memo writing, summary writing, and resumes are also included.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ENS-333 Programming for Engineers

    Prerequisites:

    ENS L333 concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course will introduce programming concepts in the context of solving engineering problems. Emphasis will be placed on applying the high-level programming skills learned to particular platforms such as embedded systems. Students will implement various microcontroller programming exercises as well as an end of the semester project.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ENS-L333 Programming for Engineers Lab

    Prerequisites:

    ENS 333 concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    The Programming for Engineers lab is designed to supplement the Programming for Engineers Course.

  • ENVE-220 Design and Design Tools

    Prerequisites:

    ENVE-104; PHYS-151

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course applies design tools (AutoCAD primarily and others as necessary for specified design problems) to design problems specified by the instructor.

  • ENVE-325 Geographical Information Science

    Prerequisites:

    Approved computer programming course or permission of instructor.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course provides the fundamentals of geographic information science (GIS) including the history of automated mapping. A review of the necessary hardware and software elements used in GIS is presented. Hands-on exercises with computerized mapping software are required.

  • ENVE-L325 Geographic Information Science Lab

    Prerequisites:

    concurrently with ENVE 325

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Required companion computer laboratory to be taken concurrently with ENVE 325. Prerequisite: Approved computer programming course or permission of instructor.

  • ENVE-361 Fluid Mechanics

    Prerequisites:

    ENVE-104 AND MATH-265 AND PHYS-152

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The basic equations of fluid statics and dynamics are covered in this course. Course topics include Archimedes' principle, Bernoulli's equation, and their applications; fluid kinematics, Eulerian and Lagrangian flow descriptions, and Three-dimensional flows; Reynolds transport theorem, finite control volumes, and differential analysis and modeling; and viscous flow in pipes, flow over immersed bodies, and open channel flow.

  • ENVE-365 Hydrology

    Prerequisites:

    ENVE 104 AND MATH 166 and ENVE 361.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The following topics are considered in this course: the hydrologic cycle, precipitation processes, soil moisture, infiltration, groundwater, rainfall-runoff processes, utilization of water resources, and frequency analysis. Engineering Elective.

  • ENVE-375 Heat and Thermodynamics

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-265 and PHYS-152

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course covers the elements of thermodynamic systems, the laws of thermodynamics, the parameters and concepts of thermodynamic analyses (heat, work, internal energy, enthalpy, entropy, reversibility, more), and their application to ideal gases and heat engines. Topics include statistical mechanics, phase transitions, chemical equilibrium, Gibb's equation, the Nernst equation, and heterogeneous systems.

  • ENVE-410 Water and Wastewater Systems

    Prerequisites:

    Take CHEM-112; Take ENVE-226, CHEM-355, OR Chem-211; Take ENVE-361; or permission of the instructor.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course considers the design of water and wastewater unit operations in treatment systems. Topics include water supply, water transmission and distribution systems, drinking water treatment, wastewater collection, and wastewater treatment.

  • ENVE-415 Green Engineering

    Prerequisites:

    Take ENVE-361 and ENVE-375,CHEM 211 or ENVE 226

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course presents the principles of green engineering and their application to process engineering, building design. Sustainable and renewable energy systems are a particular emphasis of the course. Topics include risk concepts, evaluating exposures, green chemistry, life cycle analysis, industrial ecology, and environmental sensors. Prerequisites: Organic Chemistry Option, ENVE 361, ENVE 375. CHEM 211 or ENVE 226 Engineering Electives. 1 term - 4 credits.

  • ENVE-510 Environmental Engineering Independent Study

    Credits:

    1.00- 6.00

    Description:

    This is an independent study in environmental engineering. Topics will vary.

  • SCI-184 Contemporary Science and Innovation

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This is a 4 credit, project based science course that examines the central scientific problems confronting the 21st century. The course consists of lectures, class discussions, field trips, and in-class hands-on activities designed to familiarize the student with different concepts of the lectures. The current focus is on sustainable energy production. A final team project related to the course topics will be given. This is the version of SCI 183 without a separate lab component. Students who have taken SCI 183, L183 are not allowed to take this course.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • PHYS-111 College Physics I

    Prerequisites:

    Take MATH-121 or MATH-134 or MATH-165 or permission of Physics department chair; PHYS L111 taken concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduction to the fundamental principles of physics. Study of vectors, Newton's laws, rotations, rigid body statics and dynamics, simple harmonic motion, heat and thermodynamics, kinetic theory. The laboratory consists of experiments to illustrate the basic concepts studied in the course.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • PHYS-L111 College Physics Lab I

    Prerequisites:

    PHYS 111 concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Introduction to the fundamental principles of physics. Study of vectors, Newton's laws, rotations, rigid body statics and dynamics, simple harmonic motion, heat and thermodynamics, kinetic theory. The laboratory consists of experiments to illustrate the basic concepts studied in the course. Error propagation, use of Excel, laboratory notebooks and formal reports required.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • PHYS-112 College Physics II

    Prerequisites:

    PHYS-111 and PHYS-L11. Must be taken concurrently with PHYS-L112.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Continuation of the fundamental principles of physics. Study of electric forces and fields, electric potential, DC circuits, electromagnetic induction, magnetic fields, AC circuits, introduction to optics, introduction to atomic, nuclear and particle physics.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • PHYS-L112 College Physics Lab II

    Prerequisites:

    PHYS 111 and PHYS L111; PHYS 112 must be taken concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Continuation of the fundamental principles of physics. Study of electric forces and fields, electric potential, DC circuits, electromagnetic induction, magnetic fields, AC circuits, introduction to optics, introduction to atomic, nuclear and particle physics. The laboratory consists of experiments to illustrate the basic concepts studied in the course. Error propagation, use of Excel, laboratory notebooks, and formal reports required.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • PHYS-151 University Physics I

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-121, MATH-165 or MATH-164 and PHYS L151 concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduction to the fundamental principles of physics using calculus. The course includes the study of vectors, Newton's laws, rotations, rigid body statics and dynamics, simple harmonic motion, heat and temperature.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • PHYS-L151 University Physics Lab I

    Prerequisites:

    PHYS 151 concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    The laboratory consists of experiments to illustrate the basic concepts studied in the course: measurements, propagation of errors, vectors, Newton's laws, work and energy, momentum, rotations, oscillations, simple harmonic motion, fluid. Knowledge of algebra, trigonometry, differentiation and integration required.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • PHYS-152 University Physics II

    Prerequisites:

    PHYS-151 and PHYS-L151. Must be taken concurrently with PHYS-L152.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This calculus based course begins with topics in kinetic theory and the laws of thermodynamics. It then covers electric charge and field, Gauss' law, electrical potential and capacitance, electric currents and DC circuits. Next magnetism, electromagnetic induction, Faraday's law and AC circuits are discussed. This is followed by Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic waves, and properties of light.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • PHYS-L152 University Physics Lab II

    Prerequisites:

    PHYS 151 and L151 and PHYS 152 must be taken concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    The laboratory consists of experiments to illustrate the basic concepts studied in the course: heat, gas laws, electric forces, field, and potential, DC and AC circuits, magnetic field, electromagnetic induction, Faraday's law, optics. Calculus, algebra, trigonometry are required. Error propagation, use of Excel, laboratory notebooks, and formal reports required.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • PHYS-153 University Physics III

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-121, MATH-164 or MATH-165

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This calculus-based course is the introduction of the topics of modern physics. It begins with special relativity, the Lorentz transformation, relativistic momentum and energy, addition of relativistic velocities, then covers early quantum theory, blackbody radiation, photoelectric effect, the Compton effect, photon interactions, pair production, and the Bohr theory of the atom. Then Schrodinger's equation is introduced with use of wave functions, particle box, barrier penetration, quantum mechanical tunneling, the Pauli Exclusion principle, the development of the periodic table, and the X-ray spectra. Development of solid state physics with bonding in molecules, band theory of solids and semiconductor behavior. The final topics cover nuclear physics, radioactivity, half-life, nuclear fission and fusion, medical uses of radiation, elementary particle physics and introduction to astrophysics.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • PHYS-L153 University Physics III Lab

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    The laboratory consists of experiments to illustrate the basic concepts of special relativity, the Lorentz transformation, relativistic momentum and energy, addition of relativistic velocities, then covers early quantum theory, blackbody radiation, photoelectric effect, the Compton effect, photon interactions, pair production, and the Bohr theory of the atom.

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • PHYS-205 Introduction to Astrophysics

    Prerequisites:

    Prerequisite: PHYS 151-152

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An introduction to the concepts and methods of astrophysics; including a history of astronomy from the ancients to Newton; light; telescopes; sun, earth, moon planets, comets, asteroids, meteors, space programs, science and technology in society. Astronomy of the cosmos; sun, stars, interstellar materials, galaxies, pulsars, quasars, black holes; nature of time relativity, cosmology.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • PHYS-206 Introduction to Radiation Oncology

    Prerequisites:

    Radiation Therapy (Major or Certificate) or Medical Dosimetry Students Only

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course will serve an an introduction to the role of the radiation therapist and medical dosimetrist in a Radiation Oncology department. Through a combination of detailed lectures, discussions, role-playing, case studies, and hands-on laboratory exercises, students will be introduced to the professional and clinical aspects of their respective professions. Additional topics included radiation safety, patients rights, infection control, communication for the clinic, patient assessment, and psychosocial aspects of cancer including death and dying.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • PHYS-213 Introduction to Earth & Planetary Interiors

    Prerequisites:

    CHEM-111 and CHEM-112 OR PHYS-111 and PHYS-112

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course introduces science majors to the constitution, composition, and energetics of the Earth's interior. It includes several important topics in Earth and planetary sciences, such as the geomagnetic field and the geodynamo, concepts of seismic exploration, geophysical fluid dynamics, and applications of geophysical methods in exploration of energy resources. It also relates the inner dynamics of planets to their surface and atmospheric effects by including topics such as evolution of planetary tectonics using seismology, gravity, geodesy, magnetics, and heat flow; dynamics of water and carbon cycles; and the origin of water on Earth and Mars. This course welcomes basic science, environmental science, engineering, and math majors.

  • PHYS-215 Nanomaterials and the Energy Problem

    Prerequisites:

    CHEM 111-112 or PHYS 111-112 Or Permission of Instructor

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course is designed as an introduction to nanotechnology and some of its important uses. It is aimed at science majors who have taken basic courses in physics or chemistry. The course will cover the properties and uses of carbon-nanotubes, nanocomposites, and other nanomaterials that are being fabricated in labs and industries around the world. It will serve as an introduction to the important role of nanomaterials in solving modern-day energy problems.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • PHYS-253 Introduction to Electronic Devices

    Prerequisites:

    Take PHYS-152 and PHYS-L152; Take PHYS-L253 concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Materials and device structures for applications in analog and digital electronics. Topics include characteristics and basic circuits for diodes, field-effect transistors, bipolar junction transistors, operational amplifiers and programmable logic devices.

  • PHYS-L253 Introduction to Electronic Devices Laboratory

    Prerequisites:

    Take PHYS-152 and PHYS-L152; Take PHYS-253 concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Materials and device structures for applications in analog and digital electronics. Topics include characteristics and basic circuits for diodes, field-effect transistors, bipolar junction transistors, operational amplifiers and programmable logic devices.

  • PHYS-301 Clinical Radiation I

    Prerequisites:

    PHYS 206; Radiation Therapy & Medical Dosimetry Students Only

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Through a systems-based approach, this course will review anatomy and physiology while teaching medical terminology. This course will also discuss the major cancers associated with each anatomical system and introduce the student to radiation therapy treatment techniques and procedures.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • PHYS-L301 Radiation Therapy Rotation I

    Prerequisites:

    Radiation Therapy Students Only

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Provides the necessary clinical experience to become a radiation therapist. All labs are conducted at our clinical affiliates. Under the supervision of licensed radiation therapists, the students will become increasingly proficient in the manipulation of treatment equipment, will gain a thorough understanding of radiation treatment plans, will deliver a prescribed radiation dose to cancer patients, and will acquire knowledge of all relevant aspects of patient care. These labs are available only to students enrolled in the clinical track.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • PHYS-302 Clinical Radiation II

    Prerequisites:

    Radiation Therapy (Major or Certificate) or Medical Dosimetry Students Only

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is a continuation of MS 301. Through the same didactic approach, the course will cover all of the anatomical systems and their related medical terminology NOT covered in MS 301.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • PHYS-L302 Radiation Therapy Rotation II

    Prerequisites:

    Radiation Therapy (Major or Certificate) Students Only

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Provides the necessary clinical experience to become a radiation therapist. All labs are conducted at our clinical affiliates. Under the supervision of licensed radiation therapists, the students will become increasingly proficient in the manipulation of treatment equipment, will gain a thorough understanding of radiation treatment plans, will deliver a prescribed radiation dose to cancer patients, and will acquire knowledge of all relevant aspects of patient care. These labs are available only to students enrolled in the clinical track.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • PHYS-L303 Radiation Therapy Rotation III

    Prerequisites:

    PHYS L302; Radiation Therapy Students Only

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Provides the necessary clinical experience to become a radiation therapist. All labs are conducted at our clinical affiliates. Under the supervision of licensed radiation therapists, the students will become increasingly proficient in the manipulation of treatment equipment, will gain a thorough understanding of radiation treatment plans, will deliver a prescribed radiation dose to cancer patients, and will acquire knowledge of all relevant aspects of patient care. These labs are available only to students enrolled in the clinical track.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • PHYS-L304 Radiation Therapy Practicum

    Prerequisites:

    Take PHYS-301 PHYS-L301;*Course fulfills the following: Expanded Classroom Requirement.

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Student radiation therapists will spend 12 weeks (full-time, 40 hrs/wk) gaining hands on patient care experience in the department of radiation oncology at our clinical affiliates. Under constant supervision by licensed therapists, the student will be guided toward the application of theory in the real world of cancer treatment.

    Term:

    Summer

  • PHYS-L311 Medical Dosimetry Rotation I

    Prerequisites:

    Medical Dosimetry Students Only

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Under the supervision of a Certified Medical Dosimetrist, students will gain hands on treatment planning experience in a clinical setting. Two,8-hour days per week, TTH.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • PHYS-L312 Medical Dosimetry Rotation II

    Prerequisites:

    Medical Dosimetry Students Only

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Under the supervision of a certified medical dosimetrist, students will gain hands on treatment planning experience in a clinical setting. Three 8-hour days per week, MWF.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • PHYS-L313 Medical Dosimetry Rotation III

    Prerequisites:

    PHYS L312, Medical Dosimetry Students Only

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Under the supervision of a Certified Medical Dosimetrist, students will gain hands on treatment planning experience in a clinical setting. Three, 8-hour days per week, MWF.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • PHYS-L314 Medical Dosimetry Practicum

    Prerequisites:

    Take PHYS-301 and PHYS-L311; *Course fulfills the following: Expanded Classroom Requirement.

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Student dosimetrists will spend 12 weeks (full-time, 40 hrs/wk) gaining hands on treatment planning experience in the department of radiation oncology at our clinical affiliates. Under constant supervision of certified medical dosimetrists, the student will be guided toward the application of theory in the real world of cancer treatment planning.

    Term:

    Summer

  • PHYS-315 Radiation Physics I

    Prerequisites:

    PHYS L315 concurrently; Radiation Biology, Radiation Science, Radiation Therapy (Major or Certificate), or Medical Dosimetry Students Only

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Content is designed to establish a thorough knowledge of the radiation physics used in radiation therapy treatments. Topics to be covered in this course include a review of basic physics (energy, mass, matter, SI units), structure of matter, types of radiations, nuclear transformations, radioactive decay, the fundamentals of x-ray generators and x-ray production, interactions of x and gamma rays with matter, absorbed dose, measurements of dose, principles of and practical use of ionization chambers and electrometers, Geiger counters and other survey meters, principles and practical use of TLDs, film, calorimetry, scintillation detectors, radiation protection and quality assurance.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • PHYS-L315 Radiation Physics I Lab

    Prerequisites:

    PHYS 315 concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    This lab will cover a broad range of experiments associated with the Department of Radiation Oncology at Massachusetts General Hospital. Topics include: Quality assurance measurements for radiation therapy, calibration of radiation teletherapy unit using ionization chambers, measurements of dose distribution via film, measurements of dose in a phantom via TLDs, radiation protection survey of therapy installation and brachytherapy sources, and radiation biology.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • PHYS-317 Radiation Physics II

    Prerequisites:

    PHYS 315; Radiation Science, Radiation Therapy and Medical Dosimetry Students Only

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course is intended to expand on the concepts and theories presented in Radiation Physics I. It will provide a detailed analysis of the treatment units used in external beam radiation therapy, their beam geometry, basic dose calculations and dose distributions. This course will also cover the principles, theories, and uses of brachytherapy. This course was previously MS 412

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • PHYS-333 Math Methods of Physics

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-265 and PHYS-153

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Applications of specific mathematical methods to problems in physics. Topics include complex analysis, integral transforms, eigenvalue problems, partial differential equations and group theory. This course is available in a hybrid/online format where all lectures are online and meetings with the instructor are required once per week. These meetings are for the purpose of helping students with homework problems, points in the video lectures they did not understand, or quizzes to test students' currency with the online material. These meetings are typically scheduled in a classroom but it is possible for a small number of students abroad to make special arrangements with the instructor so that the weekly meetings are held using online technology which supports voice and equation writing (such as the virtual classroom in Blackboard collaboration).

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • PHYS-350 Planetary Materials

    Prerequisites:

    PHYS-213

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course provides an overview of the chemical and physical properties of the material constituents of the Earth and terrestrial planets, including minerals, rocks, lavas, and supercritical water. Topics include mineral structure and composition,bonding,optical properties, x-ray diffraction, phase transformations, and surface properties. The physics and chemistry of energy materials, synthetic nanomaterials will be included with emphasis/focus on energy resources, environmental impact, and geopolitical implications. There are no mandatory prerequisites for this course, but students who have taken introductory chemistry and/or physics will be familiar with some concepts discussed, and will find the going easier. Some background in Earth science is assumed (at the level of PHYS-213), and competence in basic chemistry is expected (some review will be provided where appropriate). The course is not mathematically intensive, but an appreciation of the fundamentals of calculus is important.

  • PHYS-360 Topics in Astrobiology and Life in Extreme Environments

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-111 and PHYS-213

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The discovery of extreme environments and new insights into evolution, emergence and sustenance of life has expanded the view of life into a broader feasibility outside Earth. Discovery of exoplanets has opened up serious scientific exploration towards search for life in other planets. This upper-level course will introduce the scientific principles that underlie this newly evolving science of astrobiology. Discussion will include unique perspectives in life at extreme environments within Earth and their implication to the concepts of evolution and origins of life that form the basis for better understanding the habitability within our planet as well as any possibility of life in other planets.

  • PHYS-361 Classical Mechanics I

    Prerequisites:

    PHYS 152 ; MATH 265 which may be taken concurrently

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Newton's laws of motion, projectiles, momentum, energy, conservation laws, oscillations, Lagrange equations, generalized momenta, central forces, orbits. This course is available in a hybrid/online format where all lectures are online and meetings with the instructor are required once per week. These meetings are for the purpose of helping students with homework problems, points in the video lectures they did not understand, or quizzes to test students' currency with the online material. These meetings are typically scheduled in a classroom but it is possible for a small number of students abroad to make special arrangements with the instructor so that the weekly meetings are held using online technology which supports voice and equation writing (such as the virtual classroom in Blackboard collaboration).

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • PHYS-362 Classical Mechanics II

    Prerequisites:

    PHYS 361

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Mechanics in non-inertial frames, rotational motion of rigid bodies, coupled oscillations, nonlinear mechanics and chaos, Hamiltonian mechanics, collision theory, continuum mechanics. This course is available in a hybrid/online format where all lectures are online and meetings with the instructor are required once per week. These meetings are for the purpose of helping students with homework problems, points in the video lectures they did not understand, or quizzes to test students' currency with the online material. These meetings are typically scheduled in a classroom but it is possible for a small number of students abroad to make special arrangements with the instructor so that the weekly meetings are held using online technology which supports voice and equation writing (such as the virtual classroom in Blackboard collaboration).

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • PHYS-381 Observational Astronomy

    Prerequisites:

    PHYS 151 AND PHYS 152 OR PHYS 153.

    Credits:

    2.00- 3.00

    Description:

    The topics covered include theoretical foundations of observational astronomy, designs of telescopes, instrumentation for telescopes, data acquisition and management, as well as practical problems in observational astronomy. Offered together with the laboratory component PHYS L381.

  • PHYS-L381 Laboratory Research Assistantship III

    Prerequisites:

    Permission of Dept. Chair Required

    Credits:

    1.00- 2.00

    Description:

    This is a laboratory based research experience which involves teams of students assisting faculty in Physics/Astronomy research projects. Students will participate in an intensive laboratory training period in the Canary Islands and will follow through with research work in consultation with faculty based in the Madrid and Boston campuses. A final paper and presentation is required. Permission of department chair is required for registration and determination of course credits.

  • PHYS-411 Physics Senior Project

    Prerequisites:

    Senior Standing

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The senior project is the capstone research experience of the undergraduate Physics Major. This one semester course requires students to work one on one with faculty in an area of mutually agreed upon research. In general, the effort will involve the use of mathematical and programming skills, laboratory techniques, and possibly field work. The end result will be both a paper and a formal presentation to both faculty and students.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • PHYS-415 Dosimetry I

    Prerequisites:

    PHYS 315; PHYS L415 concurrently; Radiation Therapy & Medical Dosimetry Students Only

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course will discuss the factors that influence treatment planning and govern the clinical aspects of patient treatment. Topics to be covered include treatment planning with 3-D CT and MRI beams, isodose plan descriptions, clinical applications of treatment beams and advanced dosimetric calculations. This course will also contrast new emerging technologies with conventional radiation therapy techniques (SRT, SRS, IMRT, Image Guided Therapy, Respiratory Gating).

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • PHYS-L415 Dosimetry I Lab

    Prerequisites:

    PHYS 415 concurrently; Radiation Therapy & Medical Dosimetry Students Only

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    This lab will provide the student with the opportunity to apply clinical dosimetry principles and theories learned in the classroom to actual treatment planning situations within the clinic. Through hands-on lab exercises the student will demonstrate the use of the treatment planning instruments and interpret information they compute.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • PHYS-416 Radiation Biology

    Prerequisites:

    PHYS 315; Radiation Science, Radiation Therapy and Medical Dosimetry Students only (including Radiation Science minors)

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Topics covered include: physio-chemical aspects of energy absorption, the sequence of events after irradiation occurring on the molecular, cellular and organized tissue levels, radiation response and repair of eukaryotic cells, effects of radiation quality, dose rate, environmental conditions, cell cycle kinetics, tumor and normal cell population dynamics, radiation-induced carcinogenesis and mutagenesis, tumor pathophysiology and radiobiology, and recent advances in experimental radiation oncology.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • PHYS-417 Dosimetry II

    Prerequisites:

    Medical Dosimetry Students Only

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course is a continuation of Clinical Dosimetry I and will focus on advanced treatment planning techniques including intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), arc therapy, stereotactic treatment planning, and proton therapy. The advantages of each technique/modality over conventional 3D-treatment planning will be discussed. This will also be contrasted against the specific challenges presented by each technique such as the need for better immobilization, need for 4D CT scanning and daily IGRT (kV matching and/or CBCT).

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • PHYS-420 Radiation Oncology & Pathology

    Prerequisites:

    Radiation Therapy (Major or Certificate) or Medical Dosimetry Students Only

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course, taught by Massachusetts General Hospital physicians will review cancer epidemiology, etiology, detection, diagnosis and prevention, lymphatic drainage, and treatment. The pathology(s) of each cancer will be presented in detail including the rationale for each preferred modality of treatment.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • PHYS-422 Radiology

    Prerequisites:

    Radiation Therapy (Major or Certificate) or Medical Dosimetry Students Only

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course will begin with an introduction to radiology, reviewing x-ray production and discussing basic radiation physics, image formation (Kv, mA) and distortion (blur, magnification), conventional processing and digital imaging. The above-mentioned radiographic imaging concepts will be presented with conventional lectures as well as with several imaging laboratories. In addition, the basic principles of each imaging modality, including mammography, CT, MRI, Nuc Med, and Ultra Sound, will be presented. With the use of departmental tours and guest lecturers, the use, benefits and limitations of each will be discussed. Building upon the information previously presented, radiographic anatomy will also be covered with an emphasis on cross sectional anatomy. Students will review basic anatomy viewed in sectional planes (axial/transverse) of the body. Using CT and MRI images, the topographic relationship between internal organs and surface anatomy will be interpreted and discussed.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • PHYS-435 Brachytherapy

    Prerequisites:

    Medical Dosimetry Students Only

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Topics in this course will include, radioactive sources, calibration, instrumentation, factors affecting dose calculations, definitions of LDR, MDR and HDR, treatment planning and clinical dose calculation, implantation techniques, implant localization/verification, regulations, radiation safety, storage and QA. Detailed coverage of prostate brachytherapy including LDR and HDR will be emphasized.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • PHYS-450 Dosimetry Systems and Networking and Quality Assurance

    Prerequisites:

    Senior Status; Medical Dosimetry Students Only

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course is designed for the medical dosimetry student, to include a general overview of computer systems and networking in the field of radiation oncology. A historical view of computers will be covered as well as the intricate uses in the medical field today. Oncology information systems such as MOSAIC and ARIA, as well as radiation therapy software used for imaging, contouring, treatment planning, and patient charting applications will be covered. Data and system security will also be addressed.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • PHYS-451 Modern Physics I

    Prerequisites:

    PHYS 152

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Atoms and elementary particles, atomic, molecular and nuclear systems. Quantum states and probability amplitude, wave mechanics, and thermal properties of matter. Atomic spectra and structure, and molecular systems. Nuclear reactions, alpha and beta decay, and high energy physics.

  • PHYS-453 Modern Physics

    Prerequisites:

    PHYS-153;

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Topics include atoms and elementary particles, atomic, molecular and nuclear systems. Quantum states and probability amplitude, wave mechanics and thermal properties of matter. Atomic spectra and structure, and molecular systems. Nuclear reactions, alpha and beta decay and high energy physics. This course is available in a hybrid/online format where all lectures are online and meetings with the instructor are required once per week. These meetings are for the purpose of helping students with homework problems, points in the video lectures they did not understand, or quizzes to test students' currency with the online material. These meetings are typically scheduled in a classroom but it is possible for a small number of students abroad to make special arrangements with the instructor so that the weekly meetings are held using online technology which supports voice and equation writing (such as the virtual classroom in Blackboard collaboration).

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • PHYS-L455 Advanced Laboratory

    Prerequisites:

    PHYS 451

    Credits:

    2.00

    Description:

    Classical and modern experiments in physics; Experiments may include Frank Hertz experiment, Hall effect, nuclear magnetic resonance, quantum dots, detection of muons, x-ray spectroscopy, ellipsometry, physics of timbre of musical instruments, data acquisition.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • PHYS-461 Quantum Mechanics I

    Prerequisites:

    PHYS-361

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Non-relativistic study of particle systems, wave mechanical treatment, development of the concepts of observables, state vectors, operators and matrix representations. Hilbert space, angular momenta, coupling, symmetries, scattering, and perturbation theory. Harmonic oscillator and Hydrogen atom. This course is available in a hybrid/online format where all lectures are online and meetings with the instructor are required once a week. These meetings are for the purpose of helping students with homework problems, points in the video lectures they did not understand, or quizzes to test students' currency with the online material. These meetings are typically scheduled in a classroom but it is possible for a small number of students abroad to make special arrangements with the instructor so that the weekly meetings are held using online technology which supports voice and equation writing (such as the virtual classroom in Blackboard collaboration).

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • PHYS-462 Quantum Mechanics II

    Prerequisites:

    Take PHYS-361 and PHYS-362

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Non-relativistic study of particle systems, wave mechanical treatment, development of the concepts of observables, state vectors, operators and matrix representations. Hilbert space, angular momenta, coupling, symmetries, scattering, and perturbation theory. Harmonic oscillator and Hydrogen atom. This course is available in a hybrid/online format where all lectures are online and meetings with the instructor are required once per week. These meetings are for the purpose of helping students with homework problems, points in the video lectures they did not understand, or quizzes to test students' currency with the online material. These meetings are typically scheduled in a classroom but it is possible for a small number of students abroad to make special arrangements with the instructor so that the weekly meetings are held using online technology which supports voice and equation writing (such as the virtual classroom in Blackboard collaboration).

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • PHYS-463 Stellar Astrophysics

    Prerequisites:

    Prerequisite: PHYS-152; 1 term - 4 credits

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Physics of stars. Stellar atmospheres. Stellar interiors. Stellar evolution.

    Term:

    Summer

  • PHYS-464 Statistical Physics

    Prerequisites:

    PHYS-361, PHYS-151, PHYS-L151, PHYS-152, PHYS-L152, PHYS-153 and PHYS-L153

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Macroscopic objects are made up of huge numbers of fundamental particles whose interactions are well understood. Physical properties that emerge from these interactions are, however, not simply related to these fundamental interactions. In this course we will develop the tools of statistical physics, which will allow us to predict emergent cooperative phenomena. We will apply those tools to a wide variety of physical questions, including the behavior of glasses, polymers, heat engines, magnets, and electrons in solids. Computer simulations will be extensively used to aid visualization and provide concrete realization of models in order to impart deeper understanding of statistical physics.

  • PHYS-475 Senior Seminar for Radiation Therapy

    Prerequisites:

    Senior status, Radiation Therapy Students Only

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course will be available to senior students enrolled in the Radiation Therapy and Medical Dosimetry programs. This seminar style course will serve a number of purposes; one will be to prepare our graduating students for board certification in their respective disciplines (AART for Radiation Therapy and MDCB for Medical Dosimetry). Exam preparation will include the use of lectures, student teaching, online teaching tools, mini mock exams, and a full-length mock exam. The seminar will also assist students with the preparation of their professional resumes including discussions regarding the skills necessary to make job interviews successful.

  • PHYS-476 Senior Seminar for Medical Dosimetry

    Prerequisites:

    Senior Status and Medical Dosimetry Students Only

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course will be available to second year clinical students enrolled in the Medical Dosimetry program. This seminar style course will serve a number of purposes; one will be to prepare our graduating students for board certification in MDCB for Medical Dosimetry. Exam preparation will include the use of lectures, online teaching tools, mini mock exams, and a full-length mock exam. The seminar will also assist students with the preparation of their professional resumes including discussions regarding the skills necessary to make job interviews successful.

  • PHYS-477 Electricity and Magnetism

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Electrostatic field energy, methods for solution of boundary value problems. The magnetostatic field and magnetic circuits. Electromagnetic field energy, plane waves, wave guides and cavity resonators. Interaction of charge particles with electromagnetic fields. This course is available in a hybrid/online format where all lectures are online and meetings with the instructor are required once per week. These meetings are for the purpose of helping students with homework problems, points in the video lectures they did not understand, or quizzes to test students' currency with the online material. These meetings are typically scheduled in a classroom but it is possible for a small number of students abroad to make special arrangements with the instructor so that the weekly meetings are held using online technology which supports voice and equation writing (such as the virtual classroom in Blackboard collaboration).

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • PHYS-500 Experiential Learning in Physics

    Credits:

    0.00

    Description:

    This course requires students to complete a minimum of 15 engagement hours per semester. Students gain exposure to a variety of activities related to research in a laboratory or field setting with faculty oversight. Permission of instructor required. May be taken more than once.

  • PHYS-510 Independent Study

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Directed reading, lectures, seminar and research in selected areas of special interest.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • PHYS-570 Internship in Physics

    Prerequisites:

    At least 54 credits

    Credits:

    2.00- 4.00

    Description:

    Those students who intend to complete an internship must secure their own internship position prior to the start of the semester. A list of potential internship sites and their descriptions are available for students in the department's front office.

  • SCI-101 Physical Science I

    Prerequisites:

    One course of MATH 104,121,128(formerly 132),130,134, 164 or 165; SCI L101 taken concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    No longer offered Topics in the physical sciences treated at a level appropriate for non-science majors. Newton's laws, circular motion, heat, electricity and magnetism, optics, and atomic physics are discussed with problem sets required to illustrate the concepts.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • SCI-L101 Physical Science Lab I

    Prerequisites:

    SCI 101 concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    No longer offered Laboratory experiments and exercises to illustrate the principles covered in Science 101. On-time attendance is mandatory for pre-lab lectures. Weekly lab write-ups completed during the lab.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • SCI-102 Intro to Physical Science II

    Prerequisites:

    One course of MATH 104 OR MATH 121 OR MATH 130 OR MATH 132 OR MATH 134 MATH 164 OR MATH 165. SCI L102 Must be taken concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    No longer offered Continuation of topics in the physical sciences for nonscience majors. Nuclear physics, chemical reactions, organic compounds, latitude and longitude, study of the solar system, astronomy, and cosmology are all covered.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • SCI-L102 Physical Science Lab II

    Prerequisites:

    SCI 102 concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    No longer offered Laboratory experiments and exercises to illustrate the principles covered in Science 102. On-time attendance is mandatory for pre-lab lectures. Weekly lab write-ups completed during the lab.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • SCI-L105 Composite Science Lab

    Prerequisites:

    Permission of the department, transfer student status- 2 credits

    Credits:

    2.00

    Description:

    No longer offered Combination of lecture and lab involving subject matter in the Physical Sciences (not Life Sciences). This is intended for transfer students who have received course credit in the physical sciences from another school and who still need to satisfy a two credit laboratory requirement.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • SCI-L106 Composite Science Lab

    Prerequisites:

    Permission of the department, transfer student status- 1 credit

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    No longer offered Combination of lecture and lab involving subject matter in the Physical Sciences (not Life Sciences). This is intended for transfer students only who have received course credit in the physical sciences from another school and who still need to satisfy a one credit laboratory requirement.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • SCI-111 Introduction to Astronomy

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-128 or higher and SCI-L111 must be taken concurrently.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    History of Astronomy from the ancients to Newton; light; telescopes; sun, earth, moon planets, comets, asteroids, meteors; space programs, science and technology in society. Course culminates with a visit to the Clay Center Observatory, where students will be able to make first hand observations. For non-science majors.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • SCI-L111 Introduction to Astronomy Lab

    Prerequisites:

    Take SCI-111 concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Laboratory experiments and exercises to illustrate the principles discussed in Science 111. Observational exercises using the Celestron telescope, astrophotography exercises, and computer simulations. Course culminates with a visit to the Clay Center Observatory, where students will be able to make first hand observations.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • SCI-112 Structure of the Universe

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-128 or higher and SCI-L112 concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Astronomy of the cosmos; sun, stars, interstellar materials, galaxies, pulsars, quasars, black holes; nature of time relativity, cosmology. Course culminates with a visit to the Clay Center Observatory, where students will be able to make first hand observations. For non-science majors.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • SCI-L112 Structure of the Universe Lab

    Prerequisites:

    Take SCI-112 concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Laboratory experiments and exercises to illustrate the principles discussed in Science 112. Observational exercises using the Celestron telescope, astrophotography exercises, and computer simulations. Course culminates with a visit to the Clay Center Observatory, where students will be able to make first hand observations.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • SCI-113 A Habitable Earth Within the Solar System

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course introduces non-science majors to concepts that are central to making our planet habitable. It presents Earth in context of the solar system with a broad view of global climate change and energy resources in a quest to better understand the workings our planet. This course on Earth and Planetary Science is suitable for students who may have taken their last science and math course several years ago, or are just curious about knowing facts on major issues that pertain to the future of our planet. Together with a reading component, this course aims to give students a flavor of how researchers think, investigate and develop conclusions that directly affect our political and economic future. Topics covered in this course range from the solar system to the study of search for other habitable Earth-like planets, search for extraterrestrial life, and evolution of life on Earth. Other characteristics of this course are heavy use of audio-visual materials often including computer animations and simulations, in-class experiment demonstration, and intensive use of INTERNET-based resources.

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • SCI-161 Physical Science

    Prerequisites:

    One course from MATH 104 OR MATH 121 OR MATH 130 OR MATH 134 OR MATH-164 OR MATH 165 or permission of Dept. Chair. Students who have taken SCI 101/L101 or SCI 102/L102 are not eligible to take SCI 161.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This is a one-semester, non-lab introduction to the physical sciences. The student will obtain a good understanding of a wide variety of topics covered in selected chapters of the text (measurements, Newton's laws, energy, heat and global warming, wave motion, electricity and magnetism, atomic physics, nuclear physics, chemical reactions, and astronomy) and will be able to solve problems illustrating the most important concepts. Students who have taken SCI 101/L101 or SCI 102/L102 are not eligible to take SCI 161.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • SCI-165 Inner Workings of Physics Universe

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    About 15 billion years ago, (data indicate) the big bang occurred and the universe was born. With it came physical laws and a spectacular array of consequences that lead to the universe as we know it. This non-lab , 4 credit course explores the inner workings of the physical universe in terms of the scientific inquiry which lead to Newton's laws, an understanding of energy, waves, light, electricity, atomic structure, chemical reactions, nuclear physics, particle physics, relativity, and the big bang theory. During the course, students will learn to make use of modern resources to access scientific and technical literature to research a scientific topic. They will learn to distinguish between science and technology (e.g. quantum mechanics and nanotechnology, the discovery of the Higgs boson and the large hadron collider that made it possible, etc.) and to understand how the science, technology, and engineering disciplines play a crucial role in recognizing and solving problems of society and the world that we share.

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • SCI-181 Science and Life in the 21st Century

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    No longer offered on Boston campus This is a four credit, non-lab, science course that examines the central scientific problems confronting the 21st century. The course studies particular topics and teaches the necessary science around these topics to provide a good understanding of the issues. The topics currently are: Energy, Science and Economic Decisions, Sustainability of Life on Earth, Health and Science.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • SCI-184 Contemporary Science and Innovation

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This is a 4 credit, project based science course that examines the central scientific problems confronting the 21st century. The course consists of lectures, class discussions, field trips, and in-class hands-on activities designed to familiarize the student with different concepts of the lectures. The current focus is on sustainable energy production. A final team project related to the course topics will be given. This is the version of SCI 183 without a separate lab component. Students who have taken SCI 183, L183 are not allowed to take this course.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • SCI-201 Physics for Future Presidents

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course presents a topical introduction to the key principles and concepts of physics in the context of the world events and natural phenomena that confront world leaders and that require informed decisions and responses. Energy, health, counter-terrorism, remote sensing, space programs, nuclear proliferation, and a host of other modern challenges have technological and scientific dimensions, the understanding of which is essential to avoiding disastrous policy decisions. This course considers the application of physics to these societal challenges. The material is covered at a level and pace that a future world leader should be able to handle; the emphasis is on the development of physical reasoning skills, and not on detailed, mathematical problem solving.

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • SCI-210 Earth and Planetary Crystals

    Prerequisites:

    Take SCI-L210 concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course will provide undergraduate students of various disciplines with an introduction to gems and crystals using interactive, evidence-based teaching approaches. Crystalline forms of matter are critical to our existence. Using innovative teaching strategies of in-class hands-on demonstration, supplemented with visuals of crystal details, the course provides students insights into the formation, alteration and unique properties that make crystals invaluable. Topics range from the study of proteins and nucleic acids to the interior of planets. The in-class lectures will provide a basic guide that will serve as a platform for individually catered in-depth study. Therefore, the course is open to advanced students as well, who can pick up higher level of information for discussion and class projects.

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • SCI-L210 Earth and Planetary Crystals Laboratory

    Prerequisites:

    Take SCI-210 concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    This course introduces concepts that are central to understanding crystals, gemstones and other natural materials abundant throughout the solar system. It includes an introduction to carbon-based crystals (diamonds, proteins, viruses and ices) in context with origins of life, geopolitical significance and their applications This laboratory-based course is an introduction to modern tools and techniques for crystal analysis with a historical context of some of the greatest discoveries in science (DNA, and other nanomaterials). It presents crystals and gems from their visually appealing point of view to their sometimes-dramatic physical characteristics, with a broad view of their formation, occurrence, physics, chemistry and resources perspective.

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR