Undergraduate

  • AMST-101 American History and Culture

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course offers a basic introduction to American culture and society through the study of American History. The city of Boston and its extraordinary history and institutions will be at the heart of the class and students will frequently visit sites close to the campus. Topics will focus on areas such as the way people from different cultures have understood and misunderstood each other; the evolution of American politics and political institutions; the American Revolution and the founding documents and institutions of the United States; the distinct forms of American religion, American literature and the American economy; slavery and race in American society; the rise of America to world power; the changing role of women; the New Deal and the rise of the modern welfare state; immigration; the development of popular culture; and the meaning of Donald Trump.

  • AMST-111 Defining America and Americans

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines artistic, social, and political imaginings of America and Americans. We will read works by American and foreign observers of the United States to ask how Americans define themselves and how others see them. Course assignments will introduce students to themes, perspectives, and methods in the field of American Studies.

    Type:

    Social & Intellectual HST

  • AS-100 Introduction to Asian Studies: Culture, People, Ideas

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An interdisciplinary introduction to Asian Studies will touch upon the history, politics, economics, philosophy, geography, arts, and cultures of Asia. Sample topics include political economy, religious and cultural exchanges, international relations, Asian experience in America, and the role of Asia in the twenty-first century. Students will develop conceptual frameworks for exploring the subjects covered by the Asian Studies curriculum.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Asian Studies,Social & Intellectual HST

  • BLKST-100 Introduction to Black Studies I: Survey of the Discipline

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Introduces students to the basic concepts, literature and interdisciplinary nature of Black Studies. Provides a conceptual framework for the investigation and analysis of black history and culture as well.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • BLKST-101 Introduction to Black Studies II Research and Writing

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Introduces students to basic research techniques and methods in Black Studies including library use, identifying resources, project development, documenting sources, and writing research papers.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • BLKST-225 West African History Through Film and Literature

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the history and culture of West Africa through its portrayal in literature and film. The specific countries that will be focused on are Senegal, Mali, Burkina Faso, Ghana and Nigeria. This class will also recognize the fact that borders are a modern, man-made element of the West African landscape serving to both separate people who have historically and traditionally seen themselves as connected, and to bring together people into a nation who have historically and traditionally seen themselves as distinct from one another.

  • BLKST-226 The African American Experience in Literature and Film

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Using literature and film to present aspects of the African American experience in the United States. By using film and literature it is possible to present the broad range of cultural styles, regional variations, class differences, gender issues, family structures and multiple viewpoints that make up the African American experience. Through lectures and in-class presentations a historical context will be provided for each of the films or texts that are used during the semester.

  • BLKST-250 Haiti, Guadalupe and Martinique

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course explores the rich intellectual tradition of Haiti, Guadeloupe, and Martinique by considering historical moments linked to colonialism, the abolition of slavery, the representation of gender, departmentalization, and decolonization through essays, films, poems, novels, and short stories by critics and writers from the 19th-21st centuries.

  • BLKST-469 Research Seminar: African American Life in Slavery and Freedom- Reconstruction and the Freedman's Bureau

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Introduces students to the Reconstruction era in American history, and uses Reconstruction as a bridge to look at enslavement, which preceded the era, and the issue of freedom during, and after the era. In the first half of the class students read from texts that will provide them with an understanding of slavery, emancipation and reconstruction. The second half of the class will utilize on-line collections of the Freedman's Bureau Papers to allow students to use documents to deepen their understanding of the Reconstruction era. The class will also provide a comparative approach by considering questions of citizenship in the 19th century for people of African descent in the United States, Latin America and the Caribbean. This course is identical to HST 469.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • BLKST-510 Independent Study in Black Studies

    Prerequisites:

    An independent study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Independent study in Black Studies

  • HST-100 Introduction to Asian Studies: Culture, People, Ideas

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An interdisciplinary introduction to Asian Studies will touch upon the history, politics, economics, philosophy, geography, arts, and cultures of Asia. Sample topics include political economy, religious and cultural exchanges, international relations, the Asian experience in America, and the role of Asia in the twenty-first century. Students will develop conceptual frameworks for exploring the subjects covered by the Asian Studies curriculum.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • HST-101 History of Western Civilization I

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Surveys European culture, politics, and society from antiquity to the seventeenth century. Topics include: the Greek, Judaic, and Roman heritage; the rise of Christianity; feudal society in the Middle Ages; Renaissance and Reformation; the Scientific Revolution; and the development of absolutist and constitutional governments.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Classics Minor,Social & Intellectual HST

  • HST-102 History of Western Civilization II

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Surveys European culture, politics, and society from the Scientific Revolution to the present. Topics include: the development of absolutist and constitutional governments; the Enlightenment; the French Revolution; Industrialization and urbanization; nationalism and imperialism; World War I, World War II, and the Cold War; the decline of Europe as a world power.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Social & Intellectual HST

  • HST-103 Cultures and Social Transformations in Asia

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Presenting the major trends relevant to social, cultural, and economic transformations that can be seen in Asia today. Especially, students will explore the following trends: the Diaspora of the Chinese and Indian People; the hold of Traditional Religious Beliefs in a Modernizing Asia such as the influences of Buddhism and Islam; the preservation of Martial Values and in Militarism in Asia; Issues related to Gender and Sexuality; Pop Culture among young people in Asia.

  • HST-115 Introduction to Chinese History and Culture

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Discusses Chinese civilization from its origins to its recent rise as a world power. Spark students' interest in China and enable them to relate Chinese history and society to their lives and careers.

  • HST-121 World History I

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the major themes of human history to 1500. Topics include: hunter-gathering, the migration of humans across the globe, transitions to food production, and the development of complex societies based on agriculture. Major early Eurasian civilizations (China, India, the Middle East, and Europe) are examined (alongside their interactions with Inner Asia and the Arabian Peninsula). So too are Sub-Saharan Africa and the Americas.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Social & Intellectual HST

  • HST-122 World History II

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the major themes of human history since 1500. Topics include: the outward expansion of Europe, the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, the Age of Revolutions, the Industrial Revolution, the creation of a great-power dominated global system, the two world wars, the Cold War, the Third World, globalization, climate change, and modern social and political movements.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Social & Intellectual HST

  • HST-149 Empires & Globalization in World History I

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This is the first of the two-course series of Empires and Globalization in World History. Course discusses the origins and development of globalization and capitalism from the perspective of economic history. Major issues include the formation of the medieval trade system, the development of finance and capitalism in the early modern ages, and economic changes prior to the Industrial Revolution. The specific topics may change every year due to new academic developments and publications. Cultural Diversity B

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Social & Intellectual HST

  • HST-150 Empires & Globalization in World History II

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This is the second of the two-course series of Empires and Globalization in World History. Course discusses the origins and development of globalization and capitalism from the perspective of economic history. Major issues include state-making, wars, and the rivalry among early modern empires, economic development, the Industrial Revolution and the formation of the global trade system. The specific topics may change every year due to new academic developments and publications. Cultural Diversity B

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Social & Intellectual HST

  • HST-181 American Life to the Civil War Era

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Surveys American history from European colonization up through the era of the Civil War. Topics include interactions with Native Americans; slavery; the American Revolution; the founding of a new republic; social and economic developments in the early nineteenth century; expansion; party politics; sectional conflict; the Civil War and Reconstruction.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Social & Intellectual HST

  • HST-182 American Life Since the Civil War Era

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Surveys American history from the 1870s to the present. Topics include the new industrial order; farmer and worker protests; progressivism; America's emergence as a world power; the two World Wars; the Great Depression; the New Deal; the Cold War; post-World War II American society; the Civil rights movement; Vietnam; dissent and counterculture in the 1960s; the women's movement; economic, social, and political changes in the late-twentieth century; America's relationship to a globalized world.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Social & Intellectual HST

  • HST-200 Gateway to the Past: The Historian's Craft

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores history as an evolving academic discipline, a method of inquiry into the past, and a profession. Students learn historical thinking and research skills that enable them to frame a research question, identify and retrieve required sources, and make an argument about the ideas and actions of past peoples and societies. Required for history majors. Offered annually during Fall term.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • HST-210 Traditional Chinese Society from 1800 to 1949

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Focuses on traditional Chinese society from 1800 to 1949. Explains how elements of Chinese traditional culture contribute to modern Chinese identity and everyday life.

  • HST-218 History of the Mongols

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The history of the Mongol Empire, from the emergence of unified Mongol federation at the beginning of 13th century to its dismemberment into independent territories in Mongolia, China, Transoxiana, Iran, and Kipchak Khanate. We will discuss the topological and geographical features of the Mongolian homeland; and the social, economic, and ideological aspects of their lives. The life and the military and political achievements of Genghis Khan will be highlighted, as well as the Mongols' rule over conquered realms. We will also explore through critical discussions the most important historical approaches to the Mongols.

  • HST-227 Eyes on the Prize: Civil Rights Movement of the 20th Century

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Using the documentary series, Eyes on the Prize, a History of the Civil Rights Movement, the class will present the history of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States during the 20th century. Each week of the class will be focused around one of the 14 parts of the series. The presentation of the film segment will be accompanied by readings of texts, articles and documents.

  • HST-228 African American Experience and Public History in the U.S.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the way that African American history is presented through public history in the United States. This exploration will include monuments, memorials and historic sites that both focus on the African American experience and examine how they fit into the context of American history. Time will also be given to look at the use of films, architecture and archaeology. This will be done through reading texts, viewing of films and visiting local historic sites that explore public history and the African American experience from various geographical perspectives.

  • HST-233 The Creation of Russia

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines Russia, the world's largest country, leading energy exporter, a major nuclear and space power, and a permanent member of the UN Security Council. Topics include: the Byzantine, Nomadic, and West European cultural layers that helped form Russian civilization; the impact of the Mongols; Russia's competition and expansion against more advanced and wealthier foes; Ivan the Terrible and Peter the Great's reforms.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • HST-234 History of Sports in Boston and the World

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explore the modern Winter Olympics and the development of athletic events such as the Boston Marathon; as well as the history of basketball (invented in Massachusetts)and baseball and their importance to Boston's history. Examine some of the iconic sports figures of Boston, and the statues and monuments made to them.

  • HST-235 History of Sport and the Olympic Games

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explore the History of Boston and around the world through sports, with special focus on American football, association football(soccer) and the World Cup; the development of the NCAA, Title IX and college athletics; the Olympic Games--ancient, revival and modern. Students will also analyze how athletics and athletic events have been commemorated by statues and memorials in and around Boston.

  • HST-236 Public History and Cultural Heritage

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the key concepts and current practices of public history as an academic discipline and professional field in museums, libraries, archives, historical societies, historic houses, and preservation organizations. Examines the presentation and interpretation of history to popular audiences through documentaries, motion pictures, Web sites, and other forms of media. Topics covered will include curation, conservation, fundraising, educational and interpretive programming. Students will gain practical experience by participating in substantive, directed projects with partnering organizations.

  • HST-237 Medieval Iran under the Nomadic Dynasties

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Revolutionary changes through three crucial centuries of Iran's history (12th-15th), as Iran withstood two destructive invasions by nomadic leaders, including Genghis Khan and Tamerlane. Examines the social and economic changes Iran experienced, and the rise of Shi'ism and mysticism, which all resulted in the emergence of the Safavid dynasty. A multilateral perspective--political, cultural social, and economic--to conceptualize the different aspects of this important period.

    Type:

    Asian Studies

  • HST-238 Reemergence of Iran and Its Medieval & Early Modern History

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines many different aspects of political, social, economic, and cultural history of Iran in the two centuries (1501-1722)of the Safavid dynasty. The Safavids raised Iran's culture and civilization to a high level which had never been in its Islamic period. But the Safavids also traumatized the unity of the Islamic world, preventing the Ottomans from prosecuting their military victories over the western world.

  • HST-244 History of the Iranian Islamic Revolution

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Reviews modern Iranian politics with a special attention on the history of the Islamic Revolution of 1979; evaluates the factors which caused the revolution and its impacts on Iranian society, the Middle East, and the world. Among the important topics of discussion will be the role of the United States in Iranian politics (1953-1979); the policies of Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi (1941-1979); the hostage crisis (1979-1981); the Iran-Iraq War (1980-1988); the Reform Movement (1997-2005); and the re-emergence of radical policies under Ahmadinejad since 2005.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • HST-246 History of Modern Iran

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the contemporary history of Persia (Iran) from the time of its independence in the beginning of the sixteenth century to the present with special concentration on geographical/historical background; social structure, ethnic, religious, and linguistic diversities; Safavid and Qajar dynasties; Anglo-Russian interventions and occupations; constitutional revolution and reform; centralization, secularization and modernization under Pahlavi dynasty; opposition to westernization and Islamic revolution.

  • HST-247 History of Modern Middle East

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the broad historical forces, conflicts and major events that have shaped the contemporary nations of the modern Middle East. Topic include: the emergence of the modern Middle East from the empires of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries; the age of colonialism; the rise of nationalism; socialism, capitalism; the impact of Israeli and Palestinian conflict on the region; oil, the Islamic Revolution in Iran and the rise of Islamic fundamentalist movements; U.S. policy; and Saddam Hussein's Iraq.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • HST-248 Peaceful Coexistence: Muslims, Christians, and Jews in Medieval Iberia

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Surveys Muslim and Christian occupied territories on the Iberian Peninsula (modern-day Spain and Portugal), focusing on principal events and broad trends, 711-1492. Special emphasis will be placed on tolerance as manifested in the toleration of religious minorities, cultural and scientific interaction, translation and peaceful coexistence convivencia); and on intolerance as manifested through warfare (jihad, crusade), frontier mentality, massacres, forced conversions, the setting up of the Inquisition and the final expulsion of the Jews in 1492 and of the descendants of the converted Muslims or moriscos in 1609 and 1814.

    Type:

    Global Engagement Experience

  • HST-250 A History of Martial Arts in Movies

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Outlines the history of Chinese martial arts in five movies, highlighting Chinese views of violence, personal loyalty, government, and justice.

  • HST-251 Modern East Asia

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    China, Japan, and Korea - East Asia's critical players - share many historical influences, but each has a distinct culture, and they competed with each other for much of the twentieth century, proud of their achievements but feeling threatened by their neighbors. Lectures interspersed with movies and documentaries to show how East Asia has developed in the past one-hundred-plus years.

    Type:

    Social & Intellectual HST

  • HST-252 The Rise of China: Through Films, Media, and History

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Discusses the rise of China as the world's largest economy and its impact on our life through films, media, and history.

  • HST-255 Films and Contemporary China

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Uses a series of films to demonstrate the changes in people's lives in contemporary China. It focuses on the Reform Era between 1980 and present. The topics include Chinese politics, economic growth, social change, and popular cultures.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Asian Studies

  • HST-256 Exploring Asia

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    In this course each student will select a topic about Asia that they wish to study. Virtually any topic, to be approved by the professor, is acceptable. The goal will be to write a five to seven page paper about that topic by the end of the course. As a class, we will work together through each step of the process of defining a topic, gathering materials about it, and organizing and reporting the final paper.

  • HST-260 Asian Peoples and Cultures

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Introduces the peoples of Asia and the cultures they have created. Particular attention is paid to the lives of the common people in both historical and contemporary times. By understanding the richness and complexities of daily life in Asia, we will understand the continuities and discontinuities brought on by social, cultural, and econimic changes. We will gain an appreciation of our fellow human beings in Asia.

    Type:

    Social & Intellectual HST

  • HST-261 African History to 1800

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the history of Africa from prehistoric times to the nineteenth century to give students an introduction to African Studies and a sense of Africa's place in world history. Topics include: the Nile Valley civilizations, West African empires, the trans-Saharan trade, the slave trade, the spread and impact of Islam.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • HST-262 Modern African History Since 1800

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the history of Africa from 1800 to the present and enable students to develop an understanding of issues that affect the relationship between modern Africa and the world. Topics include: the African tradition; the impact of Islam and Christianity, abolition of the slave trade, European imperialism and colonialism, African independence movements, African nationalism, Pan Africanism.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • HST-263 Comparative Race Relations

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Compares and analyzes the history of race and politics in South Africa and the United States from the 17th century to the present. Examines how race as a social and ideological construct influenced and informed political conflicts over land, labor, and social relations in the two countries including slavery, segregation, apartheid, and the struggle to create racial democracies.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • HST-265 Comparative Slavery

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This lecture-discussion course compares the institution of slavery over time and across space. Beginning with its emergence and articulation in the Ancient World, the institution of slavery was evident on all of the continents and played a dynamic role in defining humanity and in forming social, economic, cultural, and political formations up to the Modern Era. The course examines the institution of slavery in its many manifestations from nomadic societies to sedentary ones, from kinship-based states to territorial-based ones, from tribal societies to advanced civilizations, from pre-capitalist economies to capitalist ones.

  • HST-266 Crime and Punishment in Early Modern Europe: 1500-1800

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores crime, law and punishment in Europe in the early modern era (1500-1800). Topics include: the nature of crime in early modern Europe; the purposes and roles of law (criminal, civil, and others); forms of punishment and what law, crime, and punishment tell us about early modern European society.

  • HST-268 History of the Mediterranean

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the history of the Mediterranean from the ancient times to the 20th century, with emphasis on the extraordinary interaction between the rich cultural, ethnic and religious backgrounds of the peoples of Europe, Middle East, and North Africa.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Social & Intellectual HST

  • HST-269 Early Modern France

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines early modern France (1400-1789), emphasizing the development of religious, political, and legal institutions. Topics include: the emergence of France as an absolute monarchy; the Protestant and Catholic Reformations in France; the religious wars of the sixteenth century; France's role overseas; war and diplomacy with other European countries; the Enlightenment; the French Revolution; and the rise of Napoleon.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • HST-270 Revolution! the Contours of Modern Europe, 1610-1815

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores Europe's political, social, and intellectual transformation, from the decline of Bourbon France's L'Ancien Regime, through the rise of the Enlightenment, to the upheavals of the French Revolution and Napoleon's empire.

  • HST-271 African-American History 1619-1860

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the history of Africans in the United States from their arrival in the colonies to the Civil War and the end of legal slavery. Topics examined include: the development of the slave system, African-Americans, and the Declaration of Independence, and the abolition movement.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • HST-272 African-American History From 1860

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines African American history from the end of slavery to the twenty first century. Topics examined include: Emancipation and Reconstruction, Reconstruction and the Constitution, the Harlem Renaissance, the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements, and African-Americans at the start of the twenty-first century.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • HST-274 Women in 19TH-CENTURY Europe

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the condition of European women from 1800 to 1914. Readings focus primarily on women's experiences in France and Great Britain. Topics include: the effects of industrialization on the lives of working-class women; working and middle-class women's negotiation of marriage, work, and family life; the rise of feminism, women's greater participation in the public sphere, and conservative reaction to these changes in women's place in society; women and crime; Victorian ideas about female sexuality; the politics of class and gender in nineteenth-century European society.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • HST-275 Women in 20TH-CENTURY Europe

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the changing place of women in European society since 1900. Topics include: women's suffrage and the political advances of the 1920s and 1930s; the revolution in sexual mores,birth control, and the rise of companionate marriage; women and the consumer economy; the anti-woman policies of Fascist Italy and Germany under National Socialism; liberation of women and retrenchment in the Soviet Union; World War II; feminism, sexual liberation, and women's political engagement since the 1960s; and, throughout the twentieth century, women's continuing negotiation of work and family responsibilities.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • HST-276 History of Modern Latin America

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The development of Latin American states: society, economy and culture, from colonial origins to the present. Cultural Diversity B

    Term:

    Occasional

  • HST-278 The Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) and Spain Today

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course provides an overview of the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939), examining its causes, course, consequences and relevance in 21st Century Spain. It focuses on the end of the monarchy and the Second Spanish Republic; causes of the War; Hitler, Mussolini, Stalin and the War; the International Brigades and the Abraham Lincoln Brigade; battles of the Civil War; Francoism; democracy and the pact of silence; Spain's memory wars.

    Type:

    Social & Intellectual HST

  • HST-281 History of the United Nations

    Credits:

    2.00

    Description:

    This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the United Nations, exploring the historical, institutional, theoretical foundations as well as the political processes and issues facing the organization today.

  • HST-285 Colonial History of Latin America

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An introduction to Latin America's colonial history through the Revolutionary Wars for Independence. The course examines topics that are relevant to issues and challenges facing Latin American and Caribbean peoples today, including poverty, corruption, human rights, the power of religion, race and identity, the environment, international trade, political representation, foreign intervention, cultural survival, and the exploitation of land, labor and resources.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • HST-288 Presidents We Love to Hate

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some are complete disasters. Find out why some Presidents have been consistently ranked as great, been enshrined on Mount Rushmore, and why others have not. Even the greatest have been subject to criticism and ridicule, and even the worst have had their triumphs. Explore the reasons for this, and come to understand the historical context in which different chief executives have acted.

  • HST-289 Hamilton: The Seminar

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The life and times of Alexander Hamilton--soldier, politician, financier, husband, father, philanderer, writer--through primary documents and biographical materials. We will uncover the world of the American founding and discover how we know what we know about the world that once was.

  • HST-290 19th Century America

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the history of the United States from 1810 to 1910. Students study the growth of American institutions, the rise and effects of a market society, westward expansion and Indian affairs, the enlivening of U.S. civic ideals, debates over free labor and slavery, the causes and effects of the Civil War, post-Civil War redefinitions of citizenship, immigration, Progressivism, and the nation's entry on to the world stage.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • HST-292 American Foreign Relations Since 1898

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Surveys the history of the U.S. as a world power. Examines officials' motives and methods, as well as influences on policy in the form of social and economic forces, interest groups, and foreign challenges. Explores public debates over America's role (as well as debates among historians and international relations theorists), and discusses the domestic and foreign impact of America's world role. Major events addressed include the two world wars, the Cold War, Vietnam, and the U.S. recent history of involvement in the Middle East.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • HST-304 Imperial Rome

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course offers an introduction to the Golden Age of Roman culture and power. Close readings of selections from major historians, poets, political thinkers, and philosophers will be examined in the context of Augustan Rome. Topics such as pietas, virtus, and gravitas, as well as the competing claims of public duty and private devotion, stoic maxim and erotic love lyric, will be discussed from the perspectives of writers such as Virgil, Livy, Tacitus, Horace, Catullus, and Lucretius. Cross-listed with ENG 490.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • HST-308 Public History in Practice

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the key concepts and current practices of public history as an academic discipline and professional field in museums, libraries, archives, historical societies, historic houses, and preservation organizations. Examines the presentation and interpretation of history to popular audiences through documentaries, motion pictures, Web sites, and other forms of media. Topics covered will include curation, conservation, fundraising, educational and interpretive programming. Students will gain practical experience by participating in substantive, directed projects with partnering organizations.

  • HST-312 Renaissance and Reformation Europe

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the intellectual and cultural developments of the Renaissance, and of the Protestant and Catholic Reformations in their social and political contexts. Topics include: Humanism, the rise of the city-state; art, and science; changes in family and social life; the causes of the Reformation (intellectual, social, technological); Calvinists, Lutherans, and Radical Reformers; Counter-Reformation and its political consequences; the Wars of Religion.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Social & Intellectual HST

  • HST-313 Cities of Early-Modern Europe

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the political, economic, social and cultural development of the urban experience in Europe in the 14-1700s. The history of the most important cities of the continent and Mediterranean, and their common path in business, urbanism, society and imperialism.

    Type:

    Social & Intellectual HST

  • HST-318 History of Sports in America

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This class will look at the history of sports in America from the era of American independence to the present. This course will examine the various roles which sports has played in American society including entertainment, cultural, social, political, and business.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • HST-319 The History of Black Music in America

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Using music as a window this class explores the history of Black America as well as the history of all America. Through a combination of texts, videos, and recordings this class examines the music of Black America, from it's African roots to hip hop in the 21st century. This will be done in the context and communities in which black music was created and performed, and also in relationship to the wider world.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • HST-321 History of Islam

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Presents a coherent account of the origin and history of Islam since its foundation in Arabia in the seventh century A.D. to the present. Analyzes the terms, events, characteristics, developments, movements, and institutions that have been part of the shaping of Islam. Ideological challenges and impact of Islam in the world today from both spiritual and political perspectives are examined.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • HST-322 French Revolution and Napoleon

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the origins of revolution in 18th-Century France; the outbreak of revolution; the French Republic; the Reign of Terror; the European impact of the Revolution; the career of Bonaparte; Napoleonic warfare, the rise, fall and significance of the Empire.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • HST-325 Exploration, Colonization, and Imperialism

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Begins with an overview of the Old Worlds (Africa, America, Asia and Europe) before the rise of the European hegemony. Next we will look at the growth of Europe's nation-states and their movement into the control of world trade. Then we will cover the period from the fifteenth to the nineteenth centuries - the transition from exploration to colonization to imperialism. The final segment of the class will pick up with the colonial/imperial system and its impacts on the modern world. Cultural Diversity B

    Term:

    Occasional

  • HST-326 The Russian Revolution

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the long Russian Revolution (1900-1930), one of the most important events of the 20th century. Topics include: the long-term trends and challenges that helped unleash the crises of 1917-1919; Rasputin's influence at the imperial court; challenges to the new Bolshevik regime; progress, modernization, and similarities to the new capitalist democracies of the West; the status and role of workers, women, and peasants in USSR; Lenin, Trotsky, and Stalin as leaders and individuals. (Formerly HST 433)

    Term:

    Occasional

  • HST-327 World History: Selected Topics

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Emphasizes the continuities and changes that take place within civilizations; the similarities, differences, and relationships that exist among contemporary civilizations around the world. Special attention given to the evolving conflict between traditionalism and modernity.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • HST-333 The United States: 1898-1945

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Addresses social, intellectual, and cultural developments as well as politics and economics; foreign relations (and their connection to the domestic scene) are also discussed. Topics include: the labor movement, civil rights, woman suffrage, progressivism, the rise of the U.S. as a world power, the First World War, the cultural and social crosscurrents of the nineteen-twenties, Fordism, new developments in advertising and industrial engineering, the Great Depression, the New Deal, and World War II.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • HST-334 The United States: 1945-1970

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    American history in the decades immediately following World War II. Topics include the origins of the Cold War, McCarthyism, the emergence of a consumer society, the growth of the suburbs, the Civil Rights movement, the new women's movement, Vietnam, and the political upheavals of the 1960s.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • HST-335 The United States Since 1970

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the transformation of America in the decades since the early nineteen-seventies, taking up social, intellectual, and cultural developments as well as politics and economics; foreign relations (and their connection to the domestic scene) are also emphasized. Topics include: Watergate, the aftermath of the Vietnam War, the end of the post-World War II economic boom, the culture wars, the rise of the New Right and decline of the New Deal order, the end of the cold War, America's growing involvement in the Middle East globalization, the impact and aftermath of 9/11, and the Great Recession of the early twenty-first century.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Social & Intellectual HST

  • HST-336 Fifth-Century Athens

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An introduction to Periclean Athens, the golden age of classical Greek literature and thought. Close readings of selections from the historians Herodotus and Thucydides, the dramatists Aeschylus and Euripides, the poetry of Pindar, and Plato's great work on politics, The Republic. Cross-listed with ENG 316.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • HST-342 Modern Japanese History

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines Japanese history from the beginning of the seventeenth century to the end of the twentieth century. The topics include early modern Japan during the Tokugawa era, Meiji Restoration, Japanese imperialism and World War II, Japan's emergence as the second largest economy in the world.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Asian Studies

  • HST-348 Samurai: History, Literature & Film

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the history of samurai and its cultural meaning for Japanese society. It examines not only how the samurai class developed into a major political force, but also how it has been represented by literatures and films in different eras.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Asian Studies

  • HST-357 History of Spain I

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Surveys the most transcendental social, cultural, economic and political developments in the history of Spain from the Neolithic to the Early Modern Period. Examines the broad history of the nation and its peoples and placing emphasis on three central themes: diversity within the Iberian Peninsula, the region's social and geo-political structures, and the transformation of the Old Order of the ancient kingdoms into a modern, nation-state. Topics include: the Pre-historical period, Roman Hispania, the Medieval Kingdoms, Islamic Civilization, the Christian Reconquest, the Catholic Monarchy, Imperial Spain under the Habsburgs, and the Crisis of the Spanish Empire in the 17th century.

  • HST-358 History of Spain II

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the political, economic, and social history of Spain from 1700 to the present. Topics include: the War of Spanish Succession; the Bourbon state; the Enlightenment in Spain; the impact of the French Revolution; Spain in the Napoleonic Wars; the rise of liberalism, socialism, and anarchism; the crisis of 1898; the problems of modernization; the Spanish Civil War and the Franco regime; the transition from dictatorship to democracy; Spain's international position today.

  • HST-H359 The Age of Franklin

    Prerequisites:

    Permission of the Instructor required.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790) rose from relative poverty and obscurity to become one of the most powerful and successful men of his century. Examines the political, scientific, and literary, an diplomatic cultures of the eighteenth century by focusing on Franklin's life, reading Franklin's Autobiography, and selections from his political, scientific, and satirical writings. This is an Honors-level course.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Honors

  • HST-360 Native America: From Pre-History to the Trail of Tears

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the native people of North America before and after the European conquest. Native Americans' relations with one another and their reactions to the Europeans; European and Native American perceptions of one another; white Indians and noble savages; resistance and assimilation; the United States and Indian removal.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • HST-361 Native America 1832 to Present

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Topics will include the Plains Indian Wars; ethnological aspects of Indian tribes; the pitfalls of Indian reform movements; Indian resistance to U.S. assimilation and reservation policies; the Indian New Deal; activism and the American Indian Movement; Indians' future prospects. Cultural Diversity A

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Social & Intellectual HST

  • HST-362 History of Piracy

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the historical reality of pirates and piracy, focusing on the Golden Age years of 1650 to 1730, reasons why men (and some women) turned pirate, and why there has existed a continuing fascination with pirates for centuries. Particular emphasis is placed on the interaction between pirates and New England. Students will read primary sources and accounts, secondary sources, and fictional presentations - both books and films - to better understand piracy, why it happened, and why it continues to fascinate.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • HST-363 Naval History: U.S.S. Constitution

    Prerequisites:

    03 Feb 2010 02:57pm Eric A Hatch

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    In 1794 Boston's citizens watched the largest ship built here up to that time come together at the water's edge. Students will explore the 203-year story of Constitution by learning how craftsmen built this massive ship without electric tools; by following her two hundred years of naval service to the nation; by examining life at sea for the 450 sailors and officers who lived on board for voyages lasting several months; and by surveying the ways Americans have adopted Constitution as a national symbol, using her image to adorn decorative as well as utilitarian objects. Meets at the USS CONSTITUTION Museum and the USS CONSTITUTION.

  • HST-364 History Curating & Exhibiting

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the opportunities and challenges of presenting and interpreting history through exhibits at public institutions. Examines the role of history curator as traditional keeper of the past and current presenter and communicator of history and the role of history museums/heritage centers as educational institutions for diverse, multiple audiences. Students will learn how to evaluate objects and other materials to create an historical narrative. Students will experience how to research, design, plan, fund, install, and promote exhibits of historical subjects.

  • HST-368 Boston's Historic Houses

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Working with historic houses in Boston, students will learn that art of interpreting history. Using collections, archives, and other repositories, students will research the houses and the people who lived in them. Many of these houses have existed from colonial times and had various uses. Formerly:HST 368 Introduction to Historical Interpretation.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • HST-369 American Objects: Materials, Meaning and History

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores American history through material objects - from colonial silver teapots to 1960s lava lamps. Students will investigate an object's purpose, how it was made and who made it, and interpret the object's cultural meanings for American history. Topics covered will include the decorative arts, vernacular architecture, archaeology, industrial design, ethnicity and gender, visual culture, and landscapes. Lectures and discussions will be complemented with visits to museums, historic houses, and other sites. Students will learn how to research and write about material cultures, placing objects or spaces in their historical context.

  • HST-371 U.S. Women's History Colonial to 1865

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Traces the roles, images and experiences of women in America from colonial times to 1865. Topics include the family, work, religion, education, health care, motherhood, sexuality, social and political activism legal status, labor activism and popular culture. With attention to ethnicity, race, class, age, region of residence, disability and sexual orientation, the course focuses primarily on the everyday lives of ordinary women.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • HST-372 U.S. Women's History: 1865-present

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the social and cultural history of women in the United States from the close of the Civil War to the present. Using not only gender but also race, ethnicity, class, age, disability, region of residence, and sexual orientation as important categories of analysis, this course focuses on women's private and public lives. Topics include the family, work, religion, education, health care, private lives, motherhood, sexuality, social and political activism, legal status, labor activism, and popular culture.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • HST-373 History of Human Rights

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the history of human rights from the Enlightenment to the present, including the historical origins of human rights and its evolution over time as well as topics such as slavery, imperialism, women's rights, and genocide.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • HST-377 Caribbean and Latin-American Diaspora

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A look at the migration of people, along with their culture, to and from the Caribbean and Latin America. The first half of the course looks at how European, Asian and African diasporas settled in the region, assimilated and contributed to the ethnic and cultural base of Caribbean and Latin America countries in the colonial period. The second half offers insight into how and why people from the Caribbean and Latin America would later form diasporas of their own in countries like the United States in the twentieth century. Students taking this course will get a sense of the struggles, accomplishments and culture of Caribbean and Latin American peoples in the United States. Formerly HST 286.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • HST-381 American Colonial History

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the founding and settlement of North America; the social, economic, and political development of European colonies and their interactions with Native People; the social religious, and cultural world of early America; witchcraft, slavery, and warfare; the British-French struggle for control of the North American continent; and the background and causes of the American Revolution.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • HST-383 Boston: Heritage of a City

    Prerequisites:

    One History course

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Boston from its foundation in 1630 to its development as a 21st century metropolis. From the Massachusetts Bay Colony, to cradle of the American Revolution, to a Yankee merchant capital, Brahmin cultural center,and immigrant melting pot. When offered in the hybrid format, this course will meet at the regularly-scheduled time, but lectures and other course materials will be available on the course Blackboard site in case you cannot attend.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Social & Intellectual HST

  • HST-385 Slavery & Race in American History

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Topics will be selected from the following: the nature of slavery; the origins of slavery in America and the process of enslavement; the economics of slavery; the American Revolution and slavery; the slave trade; black and white women and the institution of slavery; rebellions of enslaved people; the pro-slavery argument; racial thought; masters and the culture of the South; the movement to abolish slavery; the literature of slavery; the Civil War and the end of slavery; Reconstruction; Segregation; the Civil Rights Movement; race and racism in contemporary America.

    Type:

    Social & Intellectual HST

  • HST-389 Creating the Constitution

    Prerequisites:

    Sophomore Standing Required

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Investigates the development of American constitutional government, from the political crisis of the 1780s to the Civil War. The problems of individual liberty versus government power; state rights; race and slavery; war powers; pluralism.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • HST-392 American Civil War and Reconstruction

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the biggest war in American History; from the antebellum reform and expansion movements, slavery and the deepening sectional crisis of the 1850s. Analyzes violent war and Reconstruction to 1877.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • HST-394 Slavery in Film, Literature and History

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A seminar on slavery in the United States as depicted in history, literature, and film. Topics may include resistance to slavery, honor, the attack on slavery, the cultural and social worlds of masters and enslaved people, the thought of masters and enslaved people, women and slavery, and/or slavery as an economic institution.

    Type:

    Social & Intellectual HST

  • HST-395 US History: Race and Ethnicity

    Prerequisites:

    Permission of Instructor Required

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the history of the United States from perspectives of some of America's racial and ethnic groups. Through readings, writings, and discussions students will examine the history of difference and diversity in the United States.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • HST-396 The African Diaspora

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the global dispersion of African people outside of the African continent. The history and culture of African descendant people and their communities in the Americas, Europe, and Asia will be included.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • HST-412 Europe in the 20th Century

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the political, economic, social and cultural developments of the principal European states since 1900. Topics include: World War I; the social and economic dislocations of the 1920s and 1930s; the rise of Fascism and National Socialism; World War II; the remains of colonialism; modernization and Americanization since the 1960s; the European Union; Europe after the Cold War; and throughout the twentieth century, the importance of class and class conflict, nationalism, and war in shaping the European experience.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Social & Intellectual HST

  • HST-414 Nazi Germany

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines German and European preconditions; the VersaillesTreaty and the failure of the Weimar Republic; Hitler's ideas, collaborators and institutions; Nazi foreign and domestic policy; World War II and the concentration camps.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • HST-426 Politics and Culture in Europe 1919-1939

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the social and political development of European society between the two world wars, primarily through the literature, art, and films of the period. Topics include: the dissolution of pre-1914 middle class society; deviance and sexuality in the 1920s; the role of decadence in art and the Fascist response to deviance in life and art; women, workers, and the new technology; the rise of Fascism; political engagement and polarization throughout European society in the face of economic and social crisis.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Social & Intellectual HST

  • HST-441 Social Movements in the Caribbean

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A case-study approach to studying the various means by which people in the Caribbean sought to overcome the legacies of colonial exploitation of their land, labor and resources. The course also offers lessons from the case-studies for approaching/achieving positive social change. Students will learn about the people's struggles to improve their social lives, reduce poverty, access land, expand human rights, reduce illiteracy, and gain accountability from their governments through violent and non-violent means.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • HST-469 Research Seminar: African American Life in Slavery and Freedom- Reconstruction and the Freedman's Bureau

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Introduces students to the Reconstruction era in American history, and uses Reconstruction as a bridge to look at enslavement, which preceded the era, and the issue of freedom during, and after the era. In the first half of the class students read from texts that will provide them with an understanding of slavery, emancipation and reconstruction. The second half of the class will utilize on-line collections of the Freedman's Bureau Papers to allow students to use documents to deepen their understanding of the Reconstruction era. The class will also provide a comparative approach by considering questions of citizenship in the 19th century for people of African descent in the United States, Latin America and the Caribbean. This course is identical to BLKST 469.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • HST-471 Self, Body, & Sexuality- U.S. History

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course examines American debates over the natures, capacities, and responsibilities of men and women from settlement of the New World through the present. Emphasis is given to three elements of the self: social and civic personhood, the body, and sexuality. We will focus on representations of womanhood and masculinity - across racial, ethnic, and class lines - and their effects on men and women in society, politics, and at law. Course readings will also examine concepts of human nature and the interplay among mind, body, and sexuality.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • HST-483 Death, Disease, Healing-Us Hst

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Investigates how Americans have understood and responded to health, illness, and death from the eighteenth century to the present. Examine interactions among patients, healers (orthodox and heterodox), the medical and scientific professions, business, and government. Explore the effects of scientific and technological advancements, industrialization, urbanization, immigration, war, and social movements on the nation's moral and political economies of health, and on evolving ideas about bodily integrity and autonomy, linked to historical relations of gender, race, class, and sexuality.

  • HST-H483 Death, Disease, Healing- U.S. History

    Prerequisites:

    Sophomore status required. GPA 3.3 or higher OR instructor permission.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Investigates how Americans have understood and responded to health, illness, and death from the eighteenth century to the present. Examines interactions among patients, healers (orthodox and heterodox), the medical and scientific professions, business, and government. Explores the effects of scientific and technological advancements, industrialization, urbanization, immigration, war, and social movements on the nation's moral and political economies of health, and on evolving ideas about bodily integrity and autonomy, linked to historical relations of gender, race, class, and sexuality. This is an honors-level course.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Honors

  • HST-484 History of the Emotions

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores ideas about emotional life from the fields of history, anthropology, sociology, and psychology as well as the evolution of emotion rules and prescriptions, focusing on western Europe and the United States since 1700. In the eighteenth century, emotions were seen as a positive influence on politics and public life, especially during the French Revolution. After the fall of Robespierre, the emotions were banished to the private sphere - so we will read both primary sources and recent scholarship on 19th- and 20th- century ideas about masculinity and femininity, romantic love and marriage, childrearing, and about what parents and children are supposed feel toward each other, how ideas about these subjects have changed over time, and whether our feelings change with them.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • HST-489 Germany: Film, Politics, Memory Since 1945

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores German history since 1945 through film, newsreels and other archival footage, war memorials and museums, novels, published diaries, memoirs, and recent historical scholarship. Topics include the representation, in film and other texts, of: post-war rebuilding; the German Economic Miracle; divided Berlin; 1960s and 70s radical politics; coming to terms since 1945, with Germany's Nazi past and the Holocaust; coming to terms since 1990 with the Stasi and East German past; Ostalgie (nostalgia in the 21st century for some aspects of East German socialism); the multi-cultural society that is Germany today, with new Turkish, Greek, Russian, Arab, and even Israeli communities.

    Type:

    Social & Intellectual HST

  • HST-494 Politics and Protest

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the impact of organized reform movements on American history from the 1800s to the twenty first century. In each era presented, students will explore the various dynamics that impact reform.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • HST-510 Independent Study

    Prerequisites:

    An Independent Study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    By special arrangement, members of the History department will schedule seminars or individual discussion sessions with students interested in directed reading and research. Open to Juniors and Seniors with the permission of the instructor.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • HST-522 History Internship

    Prerequisites:

    Permission of instructor required.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Require approximately 12 hours of work per week in a history-related position, at a museum, historical society, or archive. Designed to introduce the student to the professional opportunities and responsibilities in the fields of public history or historic preservation. Interested students should consult the instructor in advance. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor is required.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • HST-H555 Senior Honors Thesis

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An individual program of reading, research, and writing on an approved topic, under the supervision of a History faculty member. The completed thesis will be at least 20-25 pages reflecting original research. The qualifying student must have a 3.5 overall grade point average, and a 3.7 grade point average in History classes, must be recommended by two History faculty members, and must submit a writing sample of at least 5 pages to the Department chair by the end of their junior year. Must be taken in the Fall of the Senior year.

    Type:

    Honors

  • HSTLT-H555 Senior Honors Thesis

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An individual program of reading, research, and writing on an approved topic, under the supervision of two faculty members, one in History and one in English. The completed thesis will be at least 25-30 pages reflecting original research.

  • WGS-111 Women, History, & Culture

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the roles and images of women in Western culture and the realities of women's everyday lives through literature, film, history, art, psychology, and recent feminist scholarship. Analyzes gender inequalities and the influence of gender on social structure, human behavior, and artistic expression. Topics include: the social construction of gender and identity; domestic prescriptions for women; women and work; intersections of gender, class, and race in American society; sexualities and identity; the politics of motherhood and reproductive rights; educating girls; negotiating male privilege and structural inequalities; representations of women in Western art and film; and women as artists and gendered models of creativity in art, film, fiction, and science.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Social & Intellectual HST

  • WGS-H111 Women, History, & Culture

    Prerequisites:

    At least a 3.3 GPA required.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the roles and images of women in Western culture and the realities of women's everyday lives through literature, film, history, art, psychology, and recent feminist scholarship. Analyzes gender inequalities and the influence of gender on social structure, human behavior, and artistic expression. Topics include: the social construction of gender and identity; domestic prescriptions for women; women and work; intersections of gender, class, and race in American society; sexualities and identity; the politics of motherhood and reproductive rights; educating girls; negotiating male privilege and structural inequalities; representations of women in Western art and film; and women as artists and gendered models of creativity in art, film, fiction, and science.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Honors

  • WGS-113 Women, Science, & Society

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores women's lives from the perspective of the social and natural sciences, including examination of recent biological, psychological, and sociological theories about gender and gender roles, as well as the influence of feminist scholarship in these areas. Topics include: the social construction of gender; the psychology and biology of sex and gender; women and work; media representations of women; the female body and eating disorders; women's health and lifecycle; women and sexuality; reproduction, abortion, and motherhood; and sexual violence against women.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • WGS-115 Introduction to Gender Studies

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Introduces the key topics and debates that have shaped the field of gender studies, including queer studies, masculinity studies, and women's studies. Through lecture and class discussion of texts from literature, film, history, psychology, and sociology, explores the pervasive influence of gender on the structure of society and our everyday experiences and the role that gender plays in our understanding of love, friendship, sexuality, and even violence. Topics include: biological arguments about gender and sexuality; the social construction of gender and identity; intersections of gender, race, class, and sexuality; masculinity and femininity; and theories of sexual difference and the construction of sexuality.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Social & Intellectual HST

  • WGS-211 Heroines, Hotties & Hubris: Adolescent Girl's Books

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores what we can learn from the books that teenage girls read. In addition to a wide array of interesting and complex Young Adult novels targeted to young female readers, students will be exposed to theories of adolescent development, literary criticism, and social theory. Topics include how the dilemmas of girlhood have changed or stayed constant and the urge, so common in books for children and teens, to teach kids how to think and behave.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Studies in Literature

  • WGS-220 Other Worlds, Other Genders: Women and Science Fiction

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines through both classic and contemporary science fiction a variety of possibilities for world-reimagining in the realms of gender, sexuality, race, and other forms of difference. Draws on theories of utopian and dystopian discourse, engages with questions of biology and reproduction, and explores colonialism through first-contact and space empire narratives.

    Type:

    Studies in Literature

  • WGS-230 Bad Boys: Representations of Masculinity In Popular Culture

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the social, moral, and political construction of masculinity through an analysis of film and other expressions of popular culture. Using case studies, explores the specific ways in which boys are impacted, stigmatized, and made bad in institutional arenas such as schools, sports, politics, family systems, the military,the workplace, and the criminal justice system.

  • WGS-235 Gender and Sexuality in Visual Culture

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores visual representation of gender and sexuality in film, television, digital media, painting, and sculpture. Through readings in feminist thought and gay studies, by authors such as Kate Bornstein, Donna Haraway, David Halperin, Michel Foucault, and Lisa Cartwright, topics will include: the ways in which normality organizes gender and sexuality; effects of marginality for queer subjects of culture; popular representations of women and men, heterosexual and homosexual, gender and sexual minority subjects and their effect on our sense of ourselves; issues of identity, community, sexuality, power, and resistance; imagining alternative theories and practices in representing gender and sexuality in contemporary media culture.

  • WGS-311 Engendering Entertainment: Feminism and Popular Culture

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Investigates the complex intersections between feminism and popular culture through several different lenses: by exploring,how feminists make arguments about popular culture; by looking at the complexities of public femininity in today's popular culture, including figures such as Lady Gaga and Katy Perry and television shows like The Bachelor and Grey's Anatomy; by focusing on a variety of articulations of feminism within mass media, blogs, social media, and popular books such as Ariel Levy's Female Chauvinist Pigs, and Caitlin Moran's How to Be a Woman. Along the way we will ask questions about: what makes a work of art feminist; how modern media contributes to or distracts us from a variety of political debates in the realm of female equality and how can we, as individuals, use modern media to create and advance smart, feminist arguments.

    Type:

    Social & Intellectual HST

  • WGS-315 Feminist Thought

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Investigates how feminists, both today and in history, have understood inequality and difference and looked for the best ways to address these issues and bring about social justice. Examines how feminist theorists help us to understand how gender and other social categories, such as race, class sexuality, disability, age and nationality, are constructed within and through each other; and analyzes feminist engagements with liberalism, socialism, psychoanalysis, existentialism, post-colonialism, critical race theory, and queer theory, as well as consider anti-feminist arguments. Readings include classic critical texts by authors including Mary Wollstonecraft, Emma Goldman, Virginia Woolf, Chandra Mohanty, Gloria Anzaldua, and Judith Butler.

    Type:

    Social & Intellectual HST

  • WGS-325 Global Women's Fiction

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores of various cultural worldviews in order to reveal and assess the voices of women from around the world as they respond to important global issues such as sexual violence and gendered oppression. Topics include: national citizenship, sexual politics, legal discourse, aesthetic representation, literary movements, genre, constructions of femininity, sexual identities, and representations of gender in relation to race and class and international cultures, and the relationship of self-image to the body politic.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • WGS-H325 Global Women's Fiction

    Prerequisites:

    CAS or SBS Honors Students only or at least 3.3 GPA

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores of various cultural worldviews in order to reveal and assess the voices of women from around the world as they respond to important global issues such as sexual violence and gendered oppression. Topics include: national citizenship, sexual politics, legal discourse, aesthetic representation, literary movements, genre, constructions of femininity, sexual identities, and representations of gender in relation to race and class and international cultures, and the relationship of self-image to the body politic.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Honors

  • WGS-330 Furies to Femi-Nazis: A History of Modern Anti-Feminism

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explore the deep antipathy women have faced at nearly every turn in their struggles for civic and social inclusion. Anti-feminist denials of women's rights have taken the form of attacks on women's nature, bodies, and fitness for public life, tagging them with labels of otherness: opponents of women's rights deem them irrational, unnatural, traitors to society, even sexual deviants. This course will examine the dangers that women allegedly represent to social stability from the Enlightenment to the present day, as well as how women have fought back to assert their rights and independence.

  • WGS-335 Queer Narratives

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the stories that help us to understand communities, identities, and bodies that could be considered queer, and the ways that film, music, memoir and fiction have discussed queer as different, unusual, or other. Texts include the documentary, Paris Is Burning", Frank Ocean's 2012 album, Channel Orange", and Janet Mock's recent memoir, Redefining Realness", as well as foundational queer theory from Judith Butler, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, and Lee Edelman, among others, to help build a framework for approaching and interpreting both fictional and non-fictional accounts of queer lives.

    Type:

    Social & Intellectual HST

  • WGS-340 Women on Stage

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the history of female portrayal on the Western stage including women in Shakespeare and other early modern plays (when female characters were played by men); in Restoration comedy; the works of Oscar Wilde and George Bernard Shaw; and 20th and 21st century depictions of women on stage, including in the works of authors such as Lillian Hellman, Lorraine Hansberry, Caryl Churchill, Paula Vogel, Suzan-Lori Parks, Rebecca Gilman, and Sarah Ruhl. Students develop familiarity with key concepts in performance theory including catharsis, Brecht's alienation effect, and the distinction between performance and the performative.

  • WGS-510 Independent Study

    Prerequisites:

    An Independent Study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Substantive reading/research in an area of special interest in Women's and Gender Studies, directed by a faculty member in the appropriate academic discipline. Open to Juniors and Seniors by special arrangement with the relevant faculty member and the Director of Women's and Gender Studies. Instructor's permission required.