Student learning how to perform a Radiation Therapy

Radiation Science or Radiation Therapy: Which is Right for You?

The radiation science major is designed for students who want to pursue careers or graduate studies in the health sciences such as radiation safety or clinical research, and/or biology. Clinical training is not required for radiation science majors.

If you want to work in the medical profession as a radiation therapist, the radiation therapy major will allow you to get practical, hands-on experience in a hospital setting while you earn your degree.

Hands-on Experience with Radiation Therapy

Radiation therapy is the careful administration of highly focused forms of radiation to treat cancer and other diseases. Through observation and hands-on experience, students will become part of a team of radiation therapists, as they complete their more than 1,300 hours of clinical rotations.

Suffolk's JRCERT accredited program is a collaboration between the Suffolk University Biology Department and our world class clinical sites: Massachusetts General Hospital (Boston, MA), Brigham and Women's Hospital (Boston, MA), Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (Boston, MA), Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (Boston, MA), Newton-Wellesley Hospital (Newton, MA), and North Shore Cancer Center (Danvers, MA). Our students learn from leaders in the field while earning their clinical experience at some of the finest oncology facilities in the country.

At the hospitals, students will observe the daily responsibilities of radiation therapists, as well as patient care and the operation of treatment machines. To become enrolled in the radiation therapy program students must be selected by the Radiation Therapy Committee.  

Upon completion of the program, students will be eligible to apply to take the ARRT certification exam for radiation therapy.